FIVE DAY HINDU WEDDING- Part 3 (Post No.3338)

COMPILED BY by London Swaminathan

 

Date: 9 November 2016

 

Time uploaded in London: 19-59

 

Post No.3338

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; they are representational only; thanks.

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

Second Day of the Five Day Wedding

On the morning of the second day the bride is duly decorated and loaded with jewels, partly marriage gifts, but some probably borrowed for the occasion. Then seated in a marriage palanquin, and accompanied by dancing women and a band of music, she is taken in procession to the house where the bridegroom’s father and friends lodge. The bridegroom then, all gorgeously arrayed, joins her and sits opposite to her in the palanquin. Then they are carried round in a grand procession back to the bride’s house.

 

Husband’s Name is sacred!

 

On their return home from this procession, and also when they return from any of the processions, as they alight from the palanquin, their feet are washed by some attendants, and they are made to speak each other’s name. This also is noteworthy, as it is not customary for a wife ever to mention her husband’s name, and it is amusing to see the various shifts that are resorted to in order to avoid doing so. Even in the case of a poor woman, if asked by one strange to the customs of the country what her husband’s name is, instead of replying she will, with a titter, ask some one standing by, perhaps her own child, to mention it. Sometimes for fun, romping girls will tease a little wife to make her say her husband’s name. They will shut up her in a room, or in some other way imprison her, and not let her out until she has mentioned what is usually so sacred and unmentionable. This day is passed in singing marriage songs and feasting, with a few minor ceremonies.

 

In the evening, there is again a grand procession, like that of morning, except that they make a longer round and fireworks are let off at various places on the way. On arriving home a homam is performed, and the second day’s affairs close with the usual feastings.

 

The following is a specimen of the songs sung on such an occasion

 

A KRISHNA LULLABY.

Refrain –come, let us sing sweet lullaby.

 

Come ye with eyes that twinkle bright,

And sing your sweetest lullaby.

The cradle swings with jewels set,

And there our baby Krishna lies.

—-Come, let us sing sweet lullaby.

 

To him who did in mercy save

Lost kari from fierce makari.

To him who ever happy is,

And rescues those who do believe,

—–Come, let us sing sweet lullaby.

 

To him who slew king Kamsa vile,

Who joy dispenses to the good.

To him who saved from evils great,

The parents whom he ever loved

 

——Come, let us sing sweet lullaby.

 

To Cupid’s father, beauteous one,

Who stole the butter, Nanda’s son,

To him who bears mount Mandara,

Loved Krishna, king of Keshava.

-Come, let s sing sweet lullaby

 

Sadasyam Ceremony

On the morning of the third day there is the usual procession, after which there is an elaborate ceremony called Sadasyam or the meeting of the elders. During this ceremony presents are made

of cloths and money to various people and the forenoon closes with a grand feast.

 

In the evening a very elaborate procession is made. The people first go to the bank of a river or some nice shady place, where carpets are spread. When all are seated, betel is served round and rose-water sprinkled on them. Then various games are played. All this being over, the procession again forms and, with much blazing of torches and burning of coloured lights, braying of horns and beating of drums, singing of dancing girls, and letting off of fireworks, it slowly makes a grand progress through the streets home again. It is not a pleasant thing to meet one of these marriage processions in the narrow streets of a village, or in the crowded parts of a bazaar, when returning home after dark from an evening ride. The blare of the trumpets, the din of the drums, the swishing rush and pistol-like report of the rockets, together with the glare of the torches and coloured lights, all combined form a scene that is enough to make any animal nervous.

To be continued…………………..

 

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