21-2-2021 WORLD HINDU NEWS ROUNDUP IN ENGLISH (Post.9292)

COMPILED BY LONDON SWAMINATHAN

Post No. 9292

Date uploaded in London – –21 FEBRUARY  2021     

Contact – swami_48@yahoo.com

Pictures are taken from various sources for spreading knowledge.

this is a non- commercial blog. Thanks for your great pictures.

tamilandvedas.com, swamiindology.blogspot.com

21-2-2021 WORLD HINDU NEWS ROUNDUP IN ENGLISH

Namaste , Namaskaram to Everyone

This is a weekly ‘HINDU NEWS ROUND UP’ from around the world.

Read by SUJATHA RENGANATHAN .

XXX

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ONE pm London Time and 6-30 PM Indian Time Every SUNDAY.

Even if you miss our live broadcast on SUNDAYS

you can always visit us on FACE BOOK.COM – slash- Gnana Mayam 24 hours a day. 

Here is the WEEKLY HINDU NEWS BULLETIN from ‘Aakaasa Dhwani’

– Read by SUJATHA RENGANATHAN .

XXX

VHP leader Ashok Singhal’s family donates Rs 11 crore for Ram Mandir

A cousin of late Vishwa Hindu Parishad  leader Ashok Singhal, who is a Udaipur-based industrialist, has donated Rs 11 crore for building the Ram Mandir at Ayodhya. Arvind Singhal has donated the sum in memory of the VHP leader, who led a number of agitations for the Ram Mandir.

Arvind Singhal said that the family decided to donate the sum as the family always felt proud of the contribution of Ashok Singhal for building the Ram Mandir.

Singhal said the whole family was very happy as the process of building the temple has started. He said the family thought it should also contribute its part for the temple. This sum would be a tribute to late Ashok Singhal also, who gave his life for the Vishwa Hindu Parishad, he said.

This was the highest donation made by a family in Rajasthan.

****

News from Gujarat

11 year old girl Bhavika of Surat in Gujarat has raised Rs 50 lakhs for Ram temple. She raised the funds by singing sweet songs about Lord Ram in her Ramayana discourses.

****

Chennai Muslim businessman donates Rs 1 lakh for Ayodhya Ram Temple

In a gesture aimed at communal amity, a Muslim businessman from Chennai has donated Rs 1 lakh towards the construction of the Ram Temple at Ayodhya.

Daily wage earners like cobblers and small traders are among those making contributions to help raise the proposed magnificent structure.

When the members of the Hindu Munnani, accompanied by the volunteers approached businessman W S Habib, he gifted a cheque for Rs 1,00,008, taking the fund raisers by surprise.

According to K E Srinivasan, Chennai organiser of Dharma Jagran Manch a wing of RSS not only the affluent in the society but also the poor contributed.

“At Perambur, for instance, cobblers and other sections came forward to donate Rs 10,” he said.

At Kodungaiyur when the members solicited funds for the temple construction, shop keepers contributed their mite.

An enthusiastic seller of vermilion (kumkum) near a temple, who happened to be a Muslim, gave Rs 200 for the cause.

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ATTUKKAL PONGAL NEWS

The Kerala government has decided to conduct the famous ‘Attukal Pongala’ festival as per the COVID-19 protocol. .

Among an array of different festivals, beliefs and traditions, it is Attukal Pongala that has received a lot of attention among travellers and tourists alike. Organized in Attukal Devi’s temple in Trivandrum, the event is bedecked for the world’s largest annual gathering of women.

The festival sees women devotees visiting from all corners of Kerala making the conglomeration massive. It has also been listed in the Guinness World Record with 2.5 million women attending it at one time in the year 2009.

This year it is scheduled to take place on 27th February.

The rituals started on 19th February with tying the Kappu. Unlike previous years  the women are asked to cook and offer Pongal, that is sweet rice pudding, in their houses.

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Vasant Panchami brought new enthusiasm for country : Prime Minister Modi

Paying tribute to Maharaja Suheldev, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said, “Today I have the privilege of laying the foundation stone of the grand memorial of Maharaja Suheldev ji in Bahraich.”

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday laid the foundation stone of Maharaja Suheldev Memorial and Maharaja Suheldev Development project and dedicated to the public Maharaja Suheldev State Medical College (Baharaich) via video conferencing.

Launching the event, PM Modi said that the spring season this year has brought new hopes leaving the pandemic behind.

King Suheldev, an icon of the Rajbhar community, had defeated and killed the  Ghazi Saiyyad Salar Masud in a battle on the banks of the Chittora lake in Bahraich in 1033.

Uttar Pradesh Governor Anandi ben Patel and chief minister Yogi Adityanath were present at the programme organised in Bahraich on the occasion of birth anniversary of Maharaja Suheldev.

Xxxx

Here is some good news from Kashmir

Bells ring as temple reopens in downtown Srinagar after 31 years

The Sheetal Nath Mandir in Kralakhud area of downtown Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir, was re-opened after 31 years on Tuesday. Temple bells rang as Basant Panchmi puja and havan were performed, suspended since militancy erupted in the erstwhile state in 1990.

Around 30 Kashmiri Pandits, both migrants and non-migrants, attended the prayers. ‘Prasad’ was also distributed among the devotees.

“We have formally re-opened the temple,” Upendra Handoo, the priest, said, recalling how the temple was closed in 1990. 

Handoo said Basant Panchmi puja in Srinagar used to be performed at the Sheetal Nath Mandir where hundreds of Kashmiri Pandits congregated before militancy began.

He said Muslims living near the temple have always extended their help to the shrine management. “This time also, they helped us in the arrangements signifying the Hindu-Muslim amity.” 

He said reopening of the temple is a big confidence-building measure and would send out a message outside the Valley that Kashmir is safe. He said the Ashram Sabha members have urged the government to take more steps for the return of the Pandits to the Valley.

The Pandits had migrated en masse from the Valley after militancy erupted. According to official figures, 219 Kashmiri Pandits have been killed in the militancy-related violence in Jammu&Kashmir.

Xxx

Creative industries around Durga Puja in Bengal is worth ₹32,377 crore

The economic value of the creative industries that crop up around the Durga Puja – the biggest festival in West Bengal – is worth ₹32,377 crore, chief minister Mamata Banerjee said.

The chief minister was citing a 2018 report that the state government had commissioned to find out the economic impact of Durga Puja. The study was conducted by experts from the British Council, IIT Kharagpur, and Queen Mary University in UK.

“As per the report that was submitted on Monday, the economy of creative industries around Durga Puja is ₹32,377 crore, which is equal to $4.53 billion. This is a huge amount of money for a seven-day festival. It is comparable to the GDP of Maldives and around 2.5% of the GDP of West Bengal,” Banerjee told reporters at the state secretariat.

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HERE IS SOME MOUTH WATERING, TASTY NEWS FROM BALAJI TEMPLE

An unusual offering of two tonnes of pickles was made by a devotee to the shrine of Lord Venkateswara at Tirumala, an official of the temple said.

After offering worship at the temple, the devotee Kaaturi Ramu from Chirravuru village in Guntur district of Andhra Pradesh handed over the pickles to Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanam Board chairman YV Subba Reddy at the temple-run pilgrims free meal canteen, the official told PTI.

Different varieties of vegetable pickles, including mango, lemon, tomato, and gongura were packed in plastic canisters, the official said.

Ramu requested the TTD to utilise pickles at the canteen where over a lakh meals were served daily to the visiting devotees.

Meanwhile, a TTD press release said the foundation stone would be laid on February for the construction of a replica of the temple of Goddess Padmavathi to be built by the TTD in Chennai.

XXXX

MASS MARRIAGES IN TIRUPATI TEMPLE

A team of Vedic pandits of TTD fixed auspicious dates for the Kalyanamastu mass marriage programmes and handed over the Lagna Patrika to TTD Executive Officer Dr K.S. Jawahar Reddy  on Wednesday.

The team comprised veteran Vedic scholar G. Bala Subramanya Shastri, Dharmagiri Veda Vignana Peetham principal K.S.S. Avadhani, chief priest of Tirumala temple Archakam Venugopala Deekshitulu and former Agama advisor of TTD Vedantam Vishnu Bhattacharya. They met at Nada Neerajanam platform to deliberate and finalise the muhurat for the prestigious programme.

Speaking to media persons later, the EXECUTIV OFFICER said that the pandits finalised three auspicious dates in 2021, including May 28 ,October 30 and November 17 .

He said that Kalyanamastu is aimed at organising free mass marriages for couples from poor families. “It was successfully conducted in six phases between 2007 and 2011 as part of Hindu Sanatana Dharma Pracharam programme.

Xxxx

Haryana To Revive The Sacred Saraswati River

In an effort to revive the ancient Saraswati River, the Haryana government is planning a barrage, dam and reservoir at Adi Badri, reports The Indian Express.

While addressing a seminar on ‘Saraswati River-New Perspectives and Heritage Development’ during the ongoing International Saraswati Festival-2021 on Monday (15 February), Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar said that the project of Saraswati river revival would be beneficial to develop all such places where there is evidence of Saraswati river and its heritage.

“All the doubts regarding existence of Saraswati river have been resolved and scientific evidence has been found for its flow. According to the description found in Mahabharata, Saraswati originated from a place called Adi Badri, which is just above Yamunanagar in Haryana and just below the Shivalik hills.

 Even today people consider this place to be a place of pilgrimage,” said CM Manohar Lal Khattar while addressing the seminar organised by Vidya Bharti Sanskriti Sansthan and Haryana Saraswati Heritage Development Board.

XXXX

Kumbha Mela 2021 from April 1-30

Mahakumbh 2021 in Haridwar will start on April 1 and conclude on April 30, 2021, said Uttarkhand state government officials. 

The officials also added NO special trains will be run for the religious congregation given the coronavirus situation.

Om Prakash, chief secretary said,

Keeping in mind the prevailing Covid-19 situation, the state government has planned to integrate CCTV cameras with artificial intelligence software to keep the headcount from exceeding from the prescribed limit.

The Mahakumbh is expected to have expenses of Rs 800 Crore which are being used to provide facilities to the devotees and saints visiting the mela. 

Dates of first holy bath in the Ganges River have been announced already. The first bath will be taken on March 11, 2021 (Mahashivratri), the second on April 12 (Somwati Amavasya), the third on April 14 (Baisakhi Kumbh snan) and the fourth on April 27 (Chaitra Purnima). 

Every four years the Mini Kumbhamelas are held in rotation in 3 different places. The major festival is held every 12 years in Prayag also known as Triveni Snagam.
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NEWS ABOUT RIHANNA CONTROVERSY

Singer Rihanna is facing accusations of cultural appropriation and religious insensitivity after she posted a topless image of herself wearing a pendant depicting the Hindu god Ganesha.

The photo, which appeared on her Twitter and Instagram accounts Tuesday, shows the singer in a pair of lavender satin boxers by her lingerie label, Savage X Fenty. Among her matching purple jewels are a bracelet, a large pair of earrings and what appears to be a diamond-studded carving of the elephant-headed deity — a move branded “disrespectful” by some Hindus and other social media users in India.

The controversy comes just two weeks after Rihanna divided opinions in India by expressing her support for farmers protesting new agriculture laws in the country.

A number of commentators were quick to link Rihanna’s decision to wear a Ganesha pendant to her stance on the protests. Lawmaker Ram Kadam, a member of the country’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), suggested that she had now discredited her involvement in the matter.

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THAT IS THE END OF ‘AAKAASA DHWANI ’ HINDU NEWS BULLETIN BROADCAST FROM LONDON –

READ BY SUJATHA RENGANATHAN.

Please Wait for our Tamil News Bulletin

Now I pass it on to VAISHNAVI ANAND

tags-  English News Roundup, World, Hindu, 22121,

HINDU LEGENDS IN GREECE (Post No.9218)

WRITTEN BY LONDON SWAMINATHAN

Post No. 9218

Date uploaded in London – –2 FEBRUARY  2021     

Contact – swami_48@yahoo.com

Pictures are taken from various sources for spreading knowledge.

this is a non- commercial blog. Thanks for your great pictures.

tamilandvedas.com, swamiindology.blogspot.com

HINDU LEGENDS IN GREECE (Post No.9218)

The India We have Lost by Paramesh Choudhury (editor), 1997, New Delhi is an exceptionally good collection of all old articles about India and the World. 200 years ago lot of people have pointed out that India was the Guru of the world in many fields.

I have written many articles showing the connection between India and Greece. I have touched some aspects which were not dealt by anyone else. The connection between Sanskrit and Greek is known to the Western world for the past 250 years. But no one has shown a concrete proof that Tamil also has a link with Greek language. I have listed scores of such words in my 100+ linguistics articles.

Now I am just showing what is available in the above book without going into much details. Londoners are lucky that they can get the book from University of London (SOAS) .

Ref. JA934 721-008

ISBN 81-900127-6-2

INDIA AND EGYPT

This is an article based on Lt.Col.Wilford. He wrote in 1792 (Asiatic Researches Vol.III, 1792). He showed  that the ancient Indians colonised the countries on the border of the Nile.

Striking similarity is found between several Hindu legends and numerous passages in Greek authors concerning the Nile and the countries on its border .

Hindus have preserved the religious fables of Egypt….. since Ptolemy acknowledges himself indebted for information to many learned Indians whom he had seen at Alexandria.

Hindus discovered Nile (Nila is Blue in Sanskrit)

Speke , the discoverer of the source of Nile has his debt to Lt.Col. Wilford whose description of Egypt as Sancha Dwipa and the source of Nile paved his way to destination.

Wilford described Egypt as the SANCHA DWIPA or the Island of Shells. The sea around Egypt is full of shells of extraordinary size and beauty.

Strabo says that the natives wore sea shells as ornaments and amulets.

Another interpretation was that the natives lived in caves which looked like sea shells.

My Interpretation

After reading his article I looked at the map of Africa. The whole continent itself looks like a Conch, i.e. the Shanka. Probably this shape only gave description.

( I gave only one page information from the book)

Xxx

Narasimha Avatar- Man- Lion Incarnation of Vishnu

Greek hero Hercules did lot of adventures like Lord Krishna. Hercules is actually Hari Kula Esa, according to several scholars.

The Twelve labours of Hercules have all the Leelas of Krishna or Vishnu. The characters are same but the stories take different turns.

One of the adventures of Hercules, was killing a lion called Namean lion.  This is compared to Narasimha of Vishnu’s avatars. But in Narasimha Avatara story, Vishnu came as Man lion and  killed the demon. There is astronomical interpretation as well. Leo is simha -rasi Some astronomical events are described here according to them.

Since Greeks stole the story of Sarama dog from the Rig Veda and changed it to Hermes, there is no wonder the stole Krishna’s stories and changed as well. Krishna is dated from 3150 BCE, where as Hercules is dated only from Sixth Centuy BCE.

Wilford compares many constellations with many religious events.

Xxx

Mecca , a Hindu Shrine

According to Lt.Francis Wilford (Asiatic Journal, 1799), Mecca originally meant Mockshasthan (old spelling for Moksha- liberation) ,ie. The place which confers renunciation from all worldly attachments. Pliny calls it Maco Raba or Moca, the Great (Maha in Sanskrit) or illustrious.

This was the great place of pilgrimage for the Hindus. Wilford affirms that he came across Hindu pilgrims visiting Mecca even at the end of 18th century.

(Guru Nanak and Tamil Chera King of eighth century CE visited Mecca, because it was originally a Hindu pilgrim centre.)

Wilford also emphasises the fact that Hindus colonised  Arabia and the adjacent areas and Nineveh of Sumerians was a great holy place for the Hindus. Puranas describes the place. He also says that Goddess worship was imported to Mesopotamia from India and all the names of Goddesses are in Sanskrit.

In the Skanda Purana and Visva Sara Prakasa, we find legends similar to the origin of SEMIRAMIS, the Syrian dove, Ninus and the building of Nineveh, Heirapolis and Mecca.

Full story is given in the article

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India colonised Greece

Francis Wilford who wrote an article in 1801 in Asiatic Researches, opines that the rites and ceremonies, travelled from more ancient (India) to the modern one (Greece). Pococke in his book (India in Greece) has deduced mainly from the study of place names that Greece was colonised and civilised by the Indians.

There are striking similarities between the Greeks and the Hindus regarding religious beliefs- philosophical thoughts , language, arts and sculpture. Sir William Jones has pointed out that it is impossible to read Vedanta or the many fond composition in illustration of it without believing that Pythagoras and Plato derived their sublime theories from the same fountain with Indian sages.

Mr Colebrook, the great Orientalist, remarks boldly that a greater degree of similarity exists between the Indian doctrines and that of the earlier than the later Greeks. He concludes that Greek Philosophy between Pythagoras and Plato was indebted to Indian thought. He compared Greek Logos and Vac in the Rig Veda.

(Only two paragraphs from the first page of the article are given)

Xxxx subham xxx

 tags — India, Greece, Hindu, Greek, Mecca, Egypt

HINDU ASTROLOGY IN BABYLONIA! (Post No.7326)

clay tablet with auspicious days

WRITTEN BY  London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 10 DECEMBER 2019

 Time in London – 18-52

Post No. 7326

Pictures are taken from various sources; beware of copyright rules; don’t use them without permission; this is a non- commercial, educational blog; posted in swamiindology.blogspot.com and tamilandvedas.com simultaneously. Average hits per day for both the blogs 12,000

constellation maps

‘Ancient Mesopotamia Speaks’ is a latest book (year 2019) on Babylonia. It is published by Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University. The Yale Babylonian collection with more than 40,000 clay tablets and seals is one of the most important repositories of Mesopotamian artefacts in the world.

The Mesopotamian writing system, known as Cuneiform, was invented in southern Iraq around 3500 BCE and remained in use for 3500 years. Scholars in the Western world believe that everything we have today came to us via Greece. Greeks took it from Babylonia and spread it to other parts of the world. Early Indian scholars also wrote that astronomy and astrology came to  Hindus from the Greeks. The blunder that they made was that they thought Vedic civilization came after Babylonian. But Hindus strongly believe that Vedas and other texts were from Pre Kaliyuga period. According to them Kaliyuga began in 3102 BCE. And this belief has been there for at least 1500 years according to archaeological evidence. According to Aihole inscription and Parthivasekara pura Tamil inscription Hindu dating of Kaliyuga and Vedas was correct.

Very interesting similarities are seen between the Hindus and Babylonians with regard to Time, Calendar and Almanac. I have found the following similarities in the book:

 horoscope of Aristocrates

1.Following Luni-Solar calendar for celebrating festivals; for instance Hindus celebrate some festivals on the basis of cycle of moon and others on the cycle of Sun. Babylonians did the same.

2.Because of the 11+ days of difference between the two cycles, an Intercalary Months was inserted every third year as the unlucky 13th month. Vedic scholars also did this and called it impure/dirty month (Mala Maatha). That is why 13 is considered impure, un lucky.

3.Horoscope writing was followed by both the cultures

4. Marking favourable and unfavourable days i.e. Auspicious and Inauspicious (Subha and Asubha Dinas)

5.Good days to make medicines and to take medicines. What part of the body is controlled by which zodiac sign. Though we have lots of things about these in Sanskrit scriptures, scholars believe that we borrowed them from the Babylonians through Greeks.

6.Movement of Venus and its effects on us. Hindu astrology linked movement of Venus and Jupiter with drought and harvest.

7.Even 2000 year old Tamil Sangam literature has hundreds of astrological and astronomical remarks in Tamil verses.

Following statements in the book are interesting: –

“Babylonians had astronomical diaries marking the movements of celestial things on day today basis. Akkadian language mentioned them as ‘regular watching’.

lunar eclipse rituals 

Celestial divination is known to have been practised in Mesopotamia already in early second millennium BCE . The late first millennium BCE saw many significant developments in astrology, including schemes linking astronomical phenomena to the rise and fall of business. They applied astrology to medicine including associating signs of the zodiac to a wide range of aspects of life. In particular, we find an increasing interest in applying astrology to medicine , including associating signs of the zodiac with different parts of the body.

The most significant development within astrology, however, was casing the horoscope of a new born child. One of these horoscopes reads-

“Year 77 (of the Seleucid Era), on the fourth of the month of Simanu, in the morning of the fifth, Aristocrates was born. That day the moon was in Leo, the sun was in 12;30Gemini. (..) The place of Jupiter (his life) will be prosperous, at peace; wealth will be long lasting. Venus was in 4 degree Taurus. The place of Venus; he will find favour wherever he goes. He will have sons and daughters.”

Seleucid era began in 312 BCE.

My comments

This is how Hindu astrologers write horoscopes till this day. Seleucus Nicator was a commander in Alexander’s army and he occupied parts of Alexander’s territories after his death. When Selecus invaded India he was defeated by the mighty Hindu army of Mauryas and he made peace with Chandragupta Maurya by giving his daughter in marriage to him. So he might have taken this horoscope writing to Babylonia and not vice versa. Even the 12 zodiac sign system came to Babylonia very late. This also may be the contribution of Hindus. Before that they had some zodiac signs and not all the 12. Greeks spread it to the Western world.

–subham–

Hindu and Muslim Wedding (Post No.2988)

IMG_3805

Compiled by London swaminathan

Date:20 July 2016

Post No. 2988

Time uploaded in London :–5-44 AM

( Thanks for the Pictures)

 

DON’T REBLOG IT AT LEAST FOR A WEEK!  DON’T USE THE PICTURES; THEY ARE COPYRIGHTED BY SOMEONE.

 

(for old articles go to tamilandvedas.com OR swamiindology.blogspot.com)

 

Following piece is an interesting excerpt from a 100-year-old book written by a Muslim scholar: –

 

Source: Life and Labour of the People of India by Abdullah Yusuf Ali, Barrister at Law, London, 1907

IMG_3807

What is the marriage ceremony?

There are many picturesque and pretty rites, and feasting for days on end is the order of the day. But the chief incident of better class Hindu marriage ceremony consists in what is called the Bhaunri — the seven steps taken in unison.  All this is symbolical. The seven steps are the seven grades of life. Compare this with the seven ages of life in your own immortal bard, or the seven sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church, or the seven planets of ancient astronomy, after which the names of the week were named.

 

Among the Muhammadeans these picturesque ceremonies are not recognised. In the first place, the parties are little older. In the second  place, the Mohammadan marriage is a civil contract in which neither party merges its identity in the other.

 

The Hindu is bound to invite his whole caste or community, within a reasonable distance, to his wedding festivities; The Mohammadan only his select friends. The Mohammadan ecclesiastical ceremony is of the simplest description, as simple as that among the Society of Friends.

 

Many of the Muhammadan families restrict themselves to the ecclesiastical ceremony, but the majority have adopted or inherited in addition the customs of the country. Some even use a modified form of the Bhaunri. Prolonged feasts and ceremonies, with music or noise (whichever you prefer to call it and martial-looking pro- cessions (a relic of marriage by capture), are quite common.

 

A wealthy family’s bridal party would be mounted on palanquins, horses, elephants, and chariots, such as Abhimanyu might have used in the Great War. Coins would be scattered on the march, to be scrambled for by boys and youths of the poorer classes.

 

FIREWORKS

Fireworks play a very important part in the rejoicings incident to an Indian marriage. Most of the firework makers drive a roaring trade in the marriage season, and earn the best of their profits during that time, hibernating during the rest of the year. Thus marriage is good for trade.

 

The marriage season is limited to two or three months of the year, generally in the spring: but the heavenly aspect varies in different years. When the stars are most propitious there is regular marriage boom, with a concomitant boom the trade in fireworks, cloths, and fancy articles. But the stars may also ruin trade if they frown to the astrologers and indicate a slump in the marriage market.

 

If we may trust to the fidelity of Hogarth, English popular marriage customs were not so English popular marriage customs were not so very different in the eighteenth century from what we may observe every day in India at the present time. Take the wedding scene in the series of pictures entitled “Industry and Idleness.” The industrious apprentice has at last won the band of his master’s daughter. At the festivities the proud bridegroom is seen offering the drummer — shall we call him tom tom boy? —  bakshish in time form of hard coin. The butchers are there with the marrow bones and cleavers, just as you would find the representatives of different trades following an Indian bridal party, each with the emblems of his trade — the sweeper with his broom, and the barber with his bag. You have further in Hogarth the beggar with his merry ballad but mournful face. An Indian Bhat might well have sat for a model. But what is this? – a poor woman with a child in one wallet and “the crumbs that do fall from the master’s table” in another. Evidently a Chamarin come to assert her claims on the lord of the feast.

IMG_3806

BRIDE’S DRESS

 

How is the bride dressed, and what does she look like? Dare I attempt a word-picture? It would be more satisfactory if a gifted artist’s brush were allowed to tell its own tale. I have the honour to possess a picture in oils, The Hindu bride,” painted by Mrs Barber, which won a medal at the Simla Fine Arts Exhibition some years ago. It is a symphony in colours, but most difficult to reproduce. Let us try to gain an idea of the bride’s appearance by means of a feeble description.

 

There is the girl, with the brightest of black eyes, and a face more round than oval. The white of those eyes is of dazzling purity, like the modest little soul that looks out of them, but you can scarcely see the eyes. The cloth which serves both for head gear and body garment is drawn closely over the face. It would be difficult to name the colour of this piece of drapery. It is semi-transparent, and lets you see the glory of the raven hair and the sparkle of the jewels worn on the person, but it adds its own contribution of colour to the general harmony. Perhaps we should not call it colour: Pas la couleur, rien que la nuance, as Paul Verlaine would say. It is a suggestion in light blue silk gossamer, with a border worked in gold and silver threads, which both stiffens and enriches the airy stuff.

 

 

The jewellery errs on the side of profusion, but jewellery there is no trace of vulgarity. The drapery, which, in concealing it, heightens its effect, gives it a subdued tone where it might otherwise “cry aloud”. A row of little pearls hooked into one of the plaits of hair covers the parting of the hair in the middle. From it hangs on the forehead a flat little pendant of pearls, rubies, and moon stones, set in gold. This pendant also fits into the scheme of the caste mark if the girl is Hindu otherwise it is artistically meaningless.

 

The hair is gathered into a knot behind, and a garland of the sweet-smelling bela flowers is intertwined with it snowy white on raven black, filtered through the blue of the drapery. From the nose hangs a pearl drop, and there are sapphire earrings to match. The neck is absolutely loaded with ornaments, but you only catch a glimpse of them through an indiscreet opening of the veil. The upper arms carry amulets and charms, and the lower arms bracelets and bangles of many shapes and styles of workmanship.

 

IMG_3809

There are rings, not only for the fingers, but also for the right thumb, and one of them has a miniature mirror with a receptacle underneath for a plug of cotton wool saturated with otto of roses. There are anklets and toe rings to complete the tale of ornaments. Such is the bride as she sits on her machia, a sort of low chair, made of wood turned on the lathe and lacquered.”

A portion of the jewellery is often borrowed for the occasion. The jewellery is rarely false except in circles affected by “modern civilization”.

 

I have devoted so much space to the marriage customs, because I find that they are of perennial interest to people of all temperaments among all nations. Did not Lady Augusts Hamilton write a book on the marriage rites, customs, and ceremonies of “all nations of the universe”? this was in 1822, but the world has not much changed since then – at least in this respect.”

 

–SUBHAM—

 

 

Einstein’s Hindu Connection!

usa e=mc2

Article No.2017

Written by London swaminathan

Swami_48@yahoo.com

Date : 25  July 2014

Time uploaded in London : 6-48 am

Where did Einstein get this E= mc2 formula from? Did he get this concept after reading Hindu scriptures? We can’t say anything for sure. But there are two important clues.

Einstein was a Jew. Jews are Yadavas who migrated to Middle East during Rig Vedic days. Yadu became Juda. J=Y is linguistics. But it won’t give any clue to his discovery.

The concept of time in Hindu scripture is very different from the old Western concept. Hindu concept is very scientific. Hindu sages are called Tri Kala Jnanis= who can go beyond Past, Present and Future. Like we see TV serials and films on VCR by ‘Fast Forwarding’ and ‘Rewinding’ they saw TIME!

We are the one to tell the world first about Big Bang and Big Crunch/Shrink. We are the one to tell the world that time is different for Brahma in Celestial Worlds and Brahmins on earth. We are the one who spoke about very big numbers in astronomical terms where as other books were able to count 40 to 120. We are the one who told the world about Zero without which no scientific invention was possible. We are the one who taught the world to write numbers 1,2,3 etc. They were using complicated Roman script to write numbers until a few centuries ago.

india eistein

First clue

Einstein had several books about Hinduism in his library. One of them was ‘The Secret Doctrine’ published by the Theosophical Society. He has met Hindu scholars including Tagore. Does it say anything about what Einstein said? No. it might have helped him to think scientifically. For instance the Viswarupa Darsanam (Arjuna’s Vision of Universal Form of God) in Bhagavad Gita explains the cyclical nature of time. Even Black holes may be explained with that description. Everything is sucked into this Universal Form in an amazing speed. Arjuna was shown a parallel universe. And I am not the first one to see nuclear science in Bhagavad Gita. Even the Father of Atomic Bomb Robert Oppenheimer recited Gita sloka in great excitement when he witnessed the first atomic explosion (Please read my Atomic Bomb to Zoology in Bhagavad Gita article).

eistein quote

Second Clue

The following anecdote is found in a very old book of anecdotes:

This story is told of, and possibly by, Alfred Einstein, who was asked by his hostess at a social gathering to explain the theory of relativity. Said the great mathematician,

“Madam, I was once walking in the country on a hot day with a blind friend, and said that I would like a drink of milk.

“Milk? Said my friend, ‘Drink I know; but what is milk?

“’A white liquid’, I replied.” ‘Liquid I know; but what is white?’

“’The colour of swan’s feathers.’

“’Feathers I know; what is a swan?’

“’A bird with a crooked neck’

“’Neck I know; but what is this crooked?’

“Thereupon I lost patience. I seized his arm and straightened it. ‘That is straight’, I said; and then I bent it at the elbow. ‘That is crooked’.

“’ ‘Ah!’ said the blind man, ‘Now I know what you mean by milk!’”.

(Thesaurus of Anecdotes, page 198)

albert-ajnstajn-velika

This story is found in the Hindu ‘Katha Sarit Sagara’, which is the largest Story collection in the ancient world. All the seeds or plots of old stories such as Arabian Nights are found in it. If Einstein has said it, then he must have read several Hindu stories and scriptures. This might have given some new idea for his lateral thinking on TIME!

Vedic Hindus’ Hair Style

Compiled by London swaminathan

Date: 22 April 2015; Post No: 1821

Uploaded in London 22-08

Vedic literature is an encyclopaedia of the life of ancient Hindus. Though the Vedas are religious books, we have got lot of information about the normal secular life of people. We have got some interesting information about the Vedic hair style.

Shiva, One of the gods of Hindu Trinity, has a name due to his hair style. Kapardin is his name. It means matted locks. Even today lot of ascetics have this hair style. This name occurs in the Vedas. Rudra and Pusan wore their hair plaited or matted.

The use of the word ‘apasa’ indicates that plaits were worn by women in dressing the hair. There are undoubted references to the custom of wearing hair in braids or plaits. A maiden had her hair in four plaits (RV 10-104-3). It is very interesting to compare it with the plaited hair of Yazidis of Iraq. I have already explained in my two articles that they were ancient Hindus isolated in the hills of Iraq (Please read my articles “Hindu Vestiges in Iraq” and “Trikala Surya Upasana” ,posted on 12th and 23rd of August 2014 respectively).

The Yazidi youths wore a hair style as described in the Veda.

Yazidi boys of Iraq

Sangam Tamil literature described the Tamil women doing five types of hair styles (Aimpaal Kunthal in Tamil). This has been explained by the commentators as five different hair dos.

Kesa / hair is mentioned in the Atharva Veda (AV 5-19-3, 6-136-3), Vajasaneyi Samhita 20-5; 25-3and Satapatha Brahmana  2-5-2-48

In the hymns of Atharva Veda plenty full growth of hair is desired

Cutting and shaving of hair were in vogue. Scissors, razors and knives are mentioned in the Vedas.

Long hair was regarded womanly (SB 5-1-2-14). This shows women had long hair and they prayed for long hair. In the Mahabharata Draupadi vowed not to tie her hair until Dusshsana was killed and his blood is smeared in her hair. Women don’t dress their hair when their husbands were away.

When a woman was pregnant the ‘seemanta’ ceremony is done and lot of bangles are given to the woman. This seemanta means parting the hair. Kataka Samhita 23-1 mentioned this parting with the thorn of a porcupine – ‘salali’

Beautiful Hair style on a statue

Another term for hair style is ‘stuka’ which means a tuft of hair or wool RV 9-97-17; AV 7-74-2

The word ‘pulastin’ (KS 17-15) occurs in the sense of ‘wearer of plain hair’ as opposed to ‘kapardin’ ‘ wearer of braided /matted hair.

Locks were known as ‘sikhanda’, parting of hair ‘siman’ and top knot as ‘sikha’

We see top knot in Buddha statues. A sage had the name Pulastya, may be due to his hair style.

Rama’s hair style was described as Kaka Paksha in Ramayana (like the two wings of crow)

Siva Kapardin

Hair Treatment

Vedic Hindus were very keen to have good dense hair. In order to stop hair from falling, herbs were grown  in water and other selected places. In order to make the hair grow a paste of heated sirsa (vanquiena spinosa) and nuts of aksa (bellerica Terminalia) were applied to the head.

In short they cared much for healthy hair and they did decorate their hair with different styles. This shows that they were well advanced in fashion and style. That stood as a proof for their happy and prosperous life. Foreign “scholars” deliberately concealed all the positive things about the Vedic society and projected them as nomadic migrants.

Ten Commandments from the Bhagavad Gita

gitopadesa

Research paper written by London Swaminathan
Research article No.1452; Dated 2 December 2014.

1.Uddared Aatmanaatmaanam (Chap. 6, Sloka 5)
One should lift oneself by one’s own efforts

2.uttishta! yaso labha! (11-33)
Arise! Win Glory!

3.Klaibhyam Maa sma Gamah (2-3)
Yield not to Unmanliness

4.Karmanyeva Adhikaraste Maa Phalesu Kadacana (2-47)
Your right is to work only, but never to the fruit thereof.

5.Maamekam Saranam Vraja; Ma Sucah (18-66)
Take refuge in me alone; Worry not.

gita

6.Na Santim Aapnoti Kaamakaami (2-70)
No peace for he who hugs desires

7.Samsayaatmaa Vinasyati (4-40)
A man who is of a doubting nature perishes

8.Sraddhaavaan labhate jnaanam (4-39)
He who has faith gains wisdom

9.Sreyaan Svadharmo 18-47
Better is one’s own duty

10.Na hi Kalyaanakrut Kascit Durgatim (6-40)
For never does anyone who does Good tread the path of woe.

geethopadesam -2x3' oil-DPSC Bose

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Cremation : Sumerian – Hindu similarities

Civilisation_Sumer

Written by London Swaminathan
Post No. 1042; Dated 14th May 2014.

Most of the Hindus cremated the bodies of the people who died during Vedic days. Even Hindus prefer cremation only. We see cremation in Indus Valley as well. Hindus practised burial in the case of ascetics and infants only. Among the Hindus, very few sects followed burial. Sumerians did cremation and their funeral rites have many similarities with the Hindus.

First let me give the cremation procedures in Sumerian civilization:
1.“In the ancient near east, cremation did not normally result in complete destruction of the body, and the burned bones were collected and buried, often in a pottery container.

2.It is sporadically attested in all areas from the sixth millennium BCE on. Isolated instances of cremation among the more usual inhumation (practice of burying) as sometimes interpreted as ’burials of foreign residents or individuals somehow distinguished from the rest of the population, for example prisoners, lepers or criminals.

sumi

3.Textual evidence hints at the cremation of the dead king in the Ur III period, and of the dead substitute king in the neo – Assyrian period.

4.Cremation was practised systematically by the Hittites in the second millennium BCE. At the cemetery of the Osmankayasi, the burned remains were put in vessels inside storage jars laid in pairs mouth to mouth, and placed in a grotto. Several Hittite cremation rituals describe the treatment of the royal corpses, the best preserved being a fourteen day ritual. This took place at the capital, Hattusas, and the royal dead were brought there even if they normally resided in the provinces and had died far away. The corpse was burned in a special location, and the burned bones were wrapped in a linen cloth and placed in a grave chamber, as part of the ritual, heads of horses and oxen, and picks, spades and ploughs were also burned and the ashes scattered.

5.Cremation remained common in Syria and Anatolia in the first half of the first millennium BCE, probably lingering to a Hittite tradition. It was also known in Palestine and especially Phoenicia, often practised alongside inhumation. However there was no uniformity in the treatment of the cremated remains, which ranged from burials in urns in built tombs to placement of burnt bodies in sandpits.

6.There were a range of beliefs and funerary customs in the ancient Near East.
They believed in afterlife. If food, drink and oil were not offered as part of funerary offerings the ghost would be forced to wander around and might haunt the living. If the body is not buried properly, the treatment will be different. In the under world there are horrifying demons. The dead live in utter darkness.

From “Dictionary of the Ancient Near East”, The British Museum, London .
(all underlining and bolding are mine: swami).

sumerios

My comments
Hittites in the Middle East followed lot of Hindu customs. If it is due to the influence of Hittites, then it is definitely Hindu influence.

Hindu ceremonies are almost the same. But it differs slightly from community to community and from area to area. It may be due to geographical conditions, climate and availability of priests and materials. Since India is a vast country, they always considered what is practical and feasible.

In places like Varanasi the half burnt bodies were thrown into the Ganges River because of the special qualities of its water. Bones and ashes were collected in other places and kept in vessels to be taken to holy rivers. South Indian Brahmins even buried the urn and erected a stone in the olden days. Now it is done only for saints. On top of the saints burials (‘’Samadhis’’), either a Shiva Linga installed or Holy Basil plants (Tulsi) grown. (Compare it with paragraph numbered 1).

Hindus also observe a fourteen day ritual. After the 13th day, they wear new clothes and go to temple, formally ending the mourning period. The polluted period also finishes on that day. Even the Indian government announce a period of mourning for thirteen days when a national leader dies (Compare paragraph numbered 4).

Sangam Tamil literature which is 2000 year old has references to burial urns and cremations. They were only Hindus. They performed all the Hindu ceremonies and believed in the Hindu customs which is evident from a number of poems (Compare Para 5)

Sangam Tamil literature references:
Cremations : Purananuru 231,240,245,246,363
Burial in urn : Purananuru 256,228

Hindus also believed in ghosts and funerary gifts (see para 6). Nearly hundred different types of gifts are prescribed in the scriptures.

If the ancient Near East can have so many types of cremations and burials, then a vast country like India should have more varieties.

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Why Do Hindus Practise Homeopathy?

By S Swaminathan

Health is Wealth

Health is wealth is a popular saying in many Indian languages. The message is same, but they convey it in different ways. The Tamils developed a medical system called Siddha therapy 2000 years ago. Siddha is a person who has attained some extraordinary powers – both mental and physical. Siddha system is similar to Ayurveda – another old medical system of India. Like Ayurveda, Siddha also treats the imbalances of the three body humours called vatha/wind, pitha/bile and kapha/phlem. Siddha men used herbs and minerals to treat the sick patients.

Both Ayuerveda and Siddha believed in the principles of ‘a sound mind in a sound body’ and ‘prevention is better than cure’. The Hindu Upanishads say ‘the soul can’t be reached by a weak person’ (na ayamathma balaheenena labya – Mundakopanishad).

These indigenous systems create an awareness of diseases and emphasize the importance of healthy life. Unlike western medicines they guide you through your everyday life- literally from morning till night. They tell you what to eat and what not during a particular day or a particular time of the day. They tell you with what you should brush your teeth and which direction you should lay your head in the bed. The proverbs, similes, sayings and actual medical writings in Sanskrit and Tamil supply enough evidence for it.

Who gave the world Homeopathy?

We are told that Homeopathy was developed by the German physician Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843).But Indians know the principle long ago and are practising it in their day to day life.

The basic principles of Homeopathy are:

(1) ‘Like cures Likes’;

(2) ‘Symptoms of diseases are body’s self healing processes’ and

(3) ‘If one is administered with very dilute dose of what causes the disease, one will be cured of the disease’

When Hindus go to a holy place, they won’t drink or bathe in the water at once. Even when they go to temple tanks or holy rivers they will take three sips of water and sprinkle it on their head. Then they will use it for washing their feet and hands ,bathing etc. This small dose of three sips of water (Brahmins call it Achamana) will help them to avoid all the diseases from that particular water source. In those days, water was the main source of diseases. The mineral contents, temperature, taste and quality of water were different from place to place. There was no chlorination or protected water supply for the public. Even today one can practise this ‘achamanam’ and avoid getting diseases from water. The diluted water-in small quantity- gives immunity to us from the germs and other impurities. So Hindus know the principle of Homeopathy ‘Like cures Likes’. No need to say that we should remeber other basic rules about hygiene.

The rule for doing ‘achamana’ (sipping of water) is that the amount of water you take should submerge only one black gram seed (Urad Dhal in Hindi and Masha in Sanskrit). So when you do it three times you would have taken water that submerges only three seeds-so little. When Hindus did it they recite Lord Vishnu’s names: 1.Achyutaya Namaha 2.Ananthaya Namaha 3.Govindaya Namaha

Tamil book Tirukkural 1102 and Natrinai 140 also talk about this principle but in the context of a love sick woman’s look. “For the disease caused by this beautiful maid, she herself is the cure”-says Tirukkural. Like cures Likes!

What is the secret of black hair? 

Stress triggers or complicates most of the diseases is a modern discovery. But a Tamil Cankam poet called Pisiranthaiyar who lived 2000 years ago gives the secret of his black hair at a ripe old age in a beautiful Tamil poem.

When Pisiranthaiyar went to see the great Chola king Kopperun cholan (who was starving himself to death following an ancient Tamil rite) all were amazed to see an old poet without any grey hair. When they asked about the secret of his black hair, he sang;

“How can it be you don’t have any grey hair, through you have lived for many years?

You have asked the question and I will give you an answer!

My children have gone far in learning. My wife is rich in her virtue!

My servants do what I wish and my king, who shuns corruption, protects us!

And in my city there are many noble men who through deep knowledge, have acquired calm, have become self controlled, and the choices they make in their lives are built on the quality of restraint.”

-(Purananuru 191 by Pisiranthaiyar)

To put it in a nutshell:

My son is well educated

My wife is very cooperative

My servants are obedient

My king is a good ruler

My town is full of scholars

If one has all these, one need not worry. If you lead a care free life, you won’t get stressed. You will be ever young like Markandeya. Modern science says that stress triggers blood pressure, heart diseases, cancer and diabetes .

You are what you eat is in all our scriptures. Lord Krishna speaks in detail about the three kinds of food (Bhagavad Gita –chapter 17) and what qualities one gets from those. There is a beautiful saying as well:

“One fourth of what you eat keeps you alive and three fourths of what you eat keeps your doctor alive”

(From an Egyptian Inscription)

1,2,3,4 Out! 

Similar to this, there is a very good poem in he Tamil book ‘Neethi Neri Vilakkam’:

If one eats once a day he is a YOGI.

If anyone eats twice a day, that person is a BOGI (enjoyer of life)

If one eats three times a day, that person is a ROGI (sick person)

If one eats four times a day, that person is a Pogi (Tamil word for gone for ever/dead)

We know very well that indigestion is the root cause of all problems. Too much food leads to indigestion or obesity. This leads to other complications.

Tirukkural written by Tiruvalluvar has a full chapter (Chapter 95-Medicine) on the basic principles of Tamil medical science.

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