Hindu and Muslim Wedding (Post No.2988)

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Compiled by London swaminathan

Date:20 July 2016

Post No. 2988

Time uploaded in London :–5-44 AM

( Thanks for the Pictures)

 

DON’T REBLOG IT AT LEAST FOR A WEEK!  DON’T USE THE PICTURES; THEY ARE COPYRIGHTED BY SOMEONE.

 

(for old articles go to tamilandvedas.com OR swamiindology.blogspot.com)

 

Following piece is an interesting excerpt from a 100-year-old book written by a Muslim scholar: –

 

Source: Life and Labour of the People of India by Abdullah Yusuf Ali, Barrister at Law, London, 1907

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What is the marriage ceremony?

There are many picturesque and pretty rites, and feasting for days on end is the order of the day. But the chief incident of better class Hindu marriage ceremony consists in what is called the Bhaunri — the seven steps taken in unison.  All this is symbolical. The seven steps are the seven grades of life. Compare this with the seven ages of life in your own immortal bard, or the seven sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church, or the seven planets of ancient astronomy, after which the names of the week were named.

 

Among the Muhammadeans these picturesque ceremonies are not recognised. In the first place, the parties are little older. In the second  place, the Mohammadan marriage is a civil contract in which neither party merges its identity in the other.

 

The Hindu is bound to invite his whole caste or community, within a reasonable distance, to his wedding festivities; The Mohammadan only his select friends. The Mohammadan ecclesiastical ceremony is of the simplest description, as simple as that among the Society of Friends.

 

Many of the Muhammadan families restrict themselves to the ecclesiastical ceremony, but the majority have adopted or inherited in addition the customs of the country. Some even use a modified form of the Bhaunri. Prolonged feasts and ceremonies, with music or noise (whichever you prefer to call it and martial-looking pro- cessions (a relic of marriage by capture), are quite common.

 

A wealthy family’s bridal party would be mounted on palanquins, horses, elephants, and chariots, such as Abhimanyu might have used in the Great War. Coins would be scattered on the march, to be scrambled for by boys and youths of the poorer classes.

 

FIREWORKS

Fireworks play a very important part in the rejoicings incident to an Indian marriage. Most of the firework makers drive a roaring trade in the marriage season, and earn the best of their profits during that time, hibernating during the rest of the year. Thus marriage is good for trade.

 

The marriage season is limited to two or three months of the year, generally in the spring: but the heavenly aspect varies in different years. When the stars are most propitious there is regular marriage boom, with a concomitant boom the trade in fireworks, cloths, and fancy articles. But the stars may also ruin trade if they frown to the astrologers and indicate a slump in the marriage market.

 

If we may trust to the fidelity of Hogarth, English popular marriage customs were not so English popular marriage customs were not so very different in the eighteenth century from what we may observe every day in India at the present time. Take the wedding scene in the series of pictures entitled “Industry and Idleness.” The industrious apprentice has at last won the band of his master’s daughter. At the festivities the proud bridegroom is seen offering the drummer — shall we call him tom tom boy? —  bakshish in time form of hard coin. The butchers are there with the marrow bones and cleavers, just as you would find the representatives of different trades following an Indian bridal party, each with the emblems of his trade — the sweeper with his broom, and the barber with his bag. You have further in Hogarth the beggar with his merry ballad but mournful face. An Indian Bhat might well have sat for a model. But what is this? – a poor woman with a child in one wallet and “the crumbs that do fall from the master’s table” in another. Evidently a Chamarin come to assert her claims on the lord of the feast.

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BRIDE’S DRESS

 

How is the bride dressed, and what does she look like? Dare I attempt a word-picture? It would be more satisfactory if a gifted artist’s brush were allowed to tell its own tale. I have the honour to possess a picture in oils, The Hindu bride,” painted by Mrs Barber, which won a medal at the Simla Fine Arts Exhibition some years ago. It is a symphony in colours, but most difficult to reproduce. Let us try to gain an idea of the bride’s appearance by means of a feeble description.

 

There is the girl, with the brightest of black eyes, and a face more round than oval. The white of those eyes is of dazzling purity, like the modest little soul that looks out of them, but you can scarcely see the eyes. The cloth which serves both for head gear and body garment is drawn closely over the face. It would be difficult to name the colour of this piece of drapery. It is semi-transparent, and lets you see the glory of the raven hair and the sparkle of the jewels worn on the person, but it adds its own contribution of colour to the general harmony. Perhaps we should not call it colour: Pas la couleur, rien que la nuance, as Paul Verlaine would say. It is a suggestion in light blue silk gossamer, with a border worked in gold and silver threads, which both stiffens and enriches the airy stuff.

 

 

The jewellery errs on the side of profusion, but jewellery there is no trace of vulgarity. The drapery, which, in concealing it, heightens its effect, gives it a subdued tone where it might otherwise “cry aloud”. A row of little pearls hooked into one of the plaits of hair covers the parting of the hair in the middle. From it hangs on the forehead a flat little pendant of pearls, rubies, and moon stones, set in gold. This pendant also fits into the scheme of the caste mark if the girl is Hindu otherwise it is artistically meaningless.

 

The hair is gathered into a knot behind, and a garland of the sweet-smelling bela flowers is intertwined with it snowy white on raven black, filtered through the blue of the drapery. From the nose hangs a pearl drop, and there are sapphire earrings to match. The neck is absolutely loaded with ornaments, but you only catch a glimpse of them through an indiscreet opening of the veil. The upper arms carry amulets and charms, and the lower arms bracelets and bangles of many shapes and styles of workmanship.

 

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There are rings, not only for the fingers, but also for the right thumb, and one of them has a miniature mirror with a receptacle underneath for a plug of cotton wool saturated with otto of roses. There are anklets and toe rings to complete the tale of ornaments. Such is the bride as she sits on her machia, a sort of low chair, made of wood turned on the lathe and lacquered.”

A portion of the jewellery is often borrowed for the occasion. The jewellery is rarely false except in circles affected by “modern civilization”.

 

I have devoted so much space to the marriage customs, because I find that they are of perennial interest to people of all temperaments among all nations. Did not Lady Augusts Hamilton write a book on the marriage rites, customs, and ceremonies of “all nations of the universe”? this was in 1822, but the world has not much changed since then – at least in this respect.”

 

–SUBHAM—

 

 

Einstein’s Hindu Connection!

usa e=mc2

Article No.2017

Written by London swaminathan

Swami_48@yahoo.com

Date : 25  July 2014

Time uploaded in London : 6-48 am

Where did Einstein get this E= mc2 formula from? Did he get this concept after reading Hindu scriptures? We can’t say anything for sure. But there are two important clues.

Einstein was a Jew. Jews are Yadavas who migrated to Middle East during Rig Vedic days. Yadu became Juda. J=Y is linguistics. But it won’t give any clue to his discovery.

The concept of time in Hindu scripture is very different from the old Western concept. Hindu concept is very scientific. Hindu sages are called Tri Kala Jnanis= who can go beyond Past, Present and Future. Like we see TV serials and films on VCR by ‘Fast Forwarding’ and ‘Rewinding’ they saw TIME!

We are the one to tell the world first about Big Bang and Big Crunch/Shrink. We are the one to tell the world that time is different for Brahma in Celestial Worlds and Brahmins on earth. We are the one who spoke about very big numbers in astronomical terms where as other books were able to count 40 to 120. We are the one who told the world about Zero without which no scientific invention was possible. We are the one who taught the world to write numbers 1,2,3 etc. They were using complicated Roman script to write numbers until a few centuries ago.

india eistein

First clue

Einstein had several books about Hinduism in his library. One of them was ‘The Secret Doctrine’ published by the Theosophical Society. He has met Hindu scholars including Tagore. Does it say anything about what Einstein said? No. it might have helped him to think scientifically. For instance the Viswarupa Darsanam (Arjuna’s Vision of Universal Form of God) in Bhagavad Gita explains the cyclical nature of time. Even Black holes may be explained with that description. Everything is sucked into this Universal Form in an amazing speed. Arjuna was shown a parallel universe. And I am not the first one to see nuclear science in Bhagavad Gita. Even the Father of Atomic Bomb Robert Oppenheimer recited Gita sloka in great excitement when he witnessed the first atomic explosion (Please read my Atomic Bomb to Zoology in Bhagavad Gita article).

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Second Clue

The following anecdote is found in a very old book of anecdotes:

This story is told of, and possibly by, Alfred Einstein, who was asked by his hostess at a social gathering to explain the theory of relativity. Said the great mathematician,

“Madam, I was once walking in the country on a hot day with a blind friend, and said that I would like a drink of milk.

“Milk? Said my friend, ‘Drink I know; but what is milk?

“’A white liquid’, I replied.” ‘Liquid I know; but what is white?’

“’The colour of swan’s feathers.’

“’Feathers I know; what is a swan?’

“’A bird with a crooked neck’

“’Neck I know; but what is this crooked?’

“Thereupon I lost patience. I seized his arm and straightened it. ‘That is straight’, I said; and then I bent it at the elbow. ‘That is crooked’.

“’ ‘Ah!’ said the blind man, ‘Now I know what you mean by milk!’”.

(Thesaurus of Anecdotes, page 198)

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This story is found in the Hindu ‘Katha Sarit Sagara’, which is the largest Story collection in the ancient world. All the seeds or plots of old stories such as Arabian Nights are found in it. If Einstein has said it, then he must have read several Hindu stories and scriptures. This might have given some new idea for his lateral thinking on TIME!

Vedic Hindus’ Hair Style

Compiled by London swaminathan

Date: 22 April 2015; Post No: 1821

Uploaded in London 22-08

Vedic literature is an encyclopaedia of the life of ancient Hindus. Though the Vedas are religious books, we have got lot of information about the normal secular life of people. We have got some interesting information about the Vedic hair style.

Shiva, One of the gods of Hindu Trinity, has a name due to his hair style. Kapardin is his name. It means matted locks. Even today lot of ascetics have this hair style. This name occurs in the Vedas. Rudra and Pusan wore their hair plaited or matted.

The use of the word ‘apasa’ indicates that plaits were worn by women in dressing the hair. There are undoubted references to the custom of wearing hair in braids or plaits. A maiden had her hair in four plaits (RV 10-104-3). It is very interesting to compare it with the plaited hair of Yazidis of Iraq. I have already explained in my two articles that they were ancient Hindus isolated in the hills of Iraq (Please read my articles “Hindu Vestiges in Iraq” and “Trikala Surya Upasana” ,posted on 12th and 23rd of August 2014 respectively).

The Yazidi youths wore a hair style as described in the Veda.

Yazidi boys of Iraq

Sangam Tamil literature described the Tamil women doing five types of hair styles (Aimpaal Kunthal in Tamil). This has been explained by the commentators as five different hair dos.

Kesa / hair is mentioned in the Atharva Veda (AV 5-19-3, 6-136-3), Vajasaneyi Samhita 20-5; 25-3and Satapatha Brahmana  2-5-2-48

In the hymns of Atharva Veda plenty full growth of hair is desired

Cutting and shaving of hair were in vogue. Scissors, razors and knives are mentioned in the Vedas.

Long hair was regarded womanly (SB 5-1-2-14). This shows women had long hair and they prayed for long hair. In the Mahabharata Draupadi vowed not to tie her hair until Dusshsana was killed and his blood is smeared in her hair. Women don’t dress their hair when their husbands were away.

When a woman was pregnant the ‘seemanta’ ceremony is done and lot of bangles are given to the woman. This seemanta means parting the hair. Kataka Samhita 23-1 mentioned this parting with the thorn of a porcupine – ‘salali’

Beautiful Hair style on a statue

Another term for hair style is ‘stuka’ which means a tuft of hair or wool RV 9-97-17; AV 7-74-2

The word ‘pulastin’ (KS 17-15) occurs in the sense of ‘wearer of plain hair’ as opposed to ‘kapardin’ ‘ wearer of braided /matted hair.

Locks were known as ‘sikhanda’, parting of hair ‘siman’ and top knot as ‘sikha’

We see top knot in Buddha statues. A sage had the name Pulastya, may be due to his hair style.

Rama’s hair style was described as Kaka Paksha in Ramayana (like the two wings of crow)

Siva Kapardin

Hair Treatment

Vedic Hindus were very keen to have good dense hair. In order to stop hair from falling, herbs were grown  in water and other selected places. In order to make the hair grow a paste of heated sirsa (vanquiena spinosa) and nuts of aksa (bellerica Terminalia) were applied to the head.

In short they cared much for healthy hair and they did decorate their hair with different styles. This shows that they were well advanced in fashion and style. That stood as a proof for their happy and prosperous life. Foreign “scholars” deliberately concealed all the positive things about the Vedic society and projected them as nomadic migrants.

Ten Commandments from the Bhagavad Gita

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Research paper written by London Swaminathan
Research article No.1452; Dated 2 December 2014.

1.Uddared Aatmanaatmaanam (Chap. 6, Sloka 5)
One should lift oneself by one’s own efforts

2.uttishta! yaso labha! (11-33)
Arise! Win Glory!

3.Klaibhyam Maa sma Gamah (2-3)
Yield not to Unmanliness

4.Karmanyeva Adhikaraste Maa Phalesu Kadacana (2-47)
Your right is to work only, but never to the fruit thereof.

5.Maamekam Saranam Vraja; Ma Sucah (18-66)
Take refuge in me alone; Worry not.

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6.Na Santim Aapnoti Kaamakaami (2-70)
No peace for he who hugs desires

7.Samsayaatmaa Vinasyati (4-40)
A man who is of a doubting nature perishes

8.Sraddhaavaan labhate jnaanam (4-39)
He who has faith gains wisdom

9.Sreyaan Svadharmo 18-47
Better is one’s own duty

10.Na hi Kalyaanakrut Kascit Durgatim (6-40)
For never does anyone who does Good tread the path of woe.

geethopadesam -2x3' oil-DPSC Bose

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Cremation : Sumerian – Hindu similarities

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Written by London Swaminathan
Post No. 1042; Dated 14th May 2014.

Most of the Hindus cremated the bodies of the people who died during Vedic days. Even Hindus prefer cremation only. We see cremation in Indus Valley as well. Hindus practised burial in the case of ascetics and infants only. Among the Hindus, very few sects followed burial. Sumerians did cremation and their funeral rites have many similarities with the Hindus.

First let me give the cremation procedures in Sumerian civilization:
1.“In the ancient near east, cremation did not normally result in complete destruction of the body, and the burned bones were collected and buried, often in a pottery container.

2.It is sporadically attested in all areas from the sixth millennium BCE on. Isolated instances of cremation among the more usual inhumation (practice of burying) as sometimes interpreted as ’burials of foreign residents or individuals somehow distinguished from the rest of the population, for example prisoners, lepers or criminals.

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3.Textual evidence hints at the cremation of the dead king in the Ur III period, and of the dead substitute king in the neo – Assyrian period.

4.Cremation was practised systematically by the Hittites in the second millennium BCE. At the cemetery of the Osmankayasi, the burned remains were put in vessels inside storage jars laid in pairs mouth to mouth, and placed in a grotto. Several Hittite cremation rituals describe the treatment of the royal corpses, the best preserved being a fourteen day ritual. This took place at the capital, Hattusas, and the royal dead were brought there even if they normally resided in the provinces and had died far away. The corpse was burned in a special location, and the burned bones were wrapped in a linen cloth and placed in a grave chamber, as part of the ritual, heads of horses and oxen, and picks, spades and ploughs were also burned and the ashes scattered.

5.Cremation remained common in Syria and Anatolia in the first half of the first millennium BCE, probably lingering to a Hittite tradition. It was also known in Palestine and especially Phoenicia, often practised alongside inhumation. However there was no uniformity in the treatment of the cremated remains, which ranged from burials in urns in built tombs to placement of burnt bodies in sandpits.

6.There were a range of beliefs and funerary customs in the ancient Near East.
They believed in afterlife. If food, drink and oil were not offered as part of funerary offerings the ghost would be forced to wander around and might haunt the living. If the body is not buried properly, the treatment will be different. In the under world there are horrifying demons. The dead live in utter darkness.

From “Dictionary of the Ancient Near East”, The British Museum, London .
(all underlining and bolding are mine: swami).

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My comments
Hittites in the Middle East followed lot of Hindu customs. If it is due to the influence of Hittites, then it is definitely Hindu influence.

Hindu ceremonies are almost the same. But it differs slightly from community to community and from area to area. It may be due to geographical conditions, climate and availability of priests and materials. Since India is a vast country, they always considered what is practical and feasible.

In places like Varanasi the half burnt bodies were thrown into the Ganges River because of the special qualities of its water. Bones and ashes were collected in other places and kept in vessels to be taken to holy rivers. South Indian Brahmins even buried the urn and erected a stone in the olden days. Now it is done only for saints. On top of the saints burials (‘’Samadhis’’), either a Shiva Linga installed or Holy Basil plants (Tulsi) grown. (Compare it with paragraph numbered 1).

Hindus also observe a fourteen day ritual. After the 13th day, they wear new clothes and go to temple, formally ending the mourning period. The polluted period also finishes on that day. Even the Indian government announce a period of mourning for thirteen days when a national leader dies (Compare paragraph numbered 4).

Sangam Tamil literature which is 2000 year old has references to burial urns and cremations. They were only Hindus. They performed all the Hindu ceremonies and believed in the Hindu customs which is evident from a number of poems (Compare Para 5)

Sangam Tamil literature references:
Cremations : Purananuru 231,240,245,246,363
Burial in urn : Purananuru 256,228

Hindus also believed in ghosts and funerary gifts (see para 6). Nearly hundred different types of gifts are prescribed in the scriptures.

If the ancient Near East can have so many types of cremations and burials, then a vast country like India should have more varieties.

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Why Do Hindus Practise Homeopathy?

By S Swaminathan

Health is Wealth

Health is wealth is a popular saying in many Indian languages. The message is same, but they convey it in different ways. The Tamils developed a medical system called Siddha therapy 2000 years ago. Siddha is a person who has attained some extraordinary powers – both mental and physical. Siddha system is similar to Ayurveda – another old medical system of India. Like Ayurveda, Siddha also treats the imbalances of the three body humours called vatha/wind, pitha/bile and kapha/phlem. Siddha men used herbs and minerals to treat the sick patients.

Both Ayuerveda and Siddha believed in the principles of ‘a sound mind in a sound body’ and ‘prevention is better than cure’. The Hindu Upanishads say ‘the soul can’t be reached by a weak person’ (na ayamathma balaheenena labya – Mundakopanishad).

These indigenous systems create an awareness of diseases and emphasize the importance of healthy life. Unlike western medicines they guide you through your everyday life- literally from morning till night. They tell you what to eat and what not during a particular day or a particular time of the day. They tell you with what you should brush your teeth and which direction you should lay your head in the bed. The proverbs, similes, sayings and actual medical writings in Sanskrit and Tamil supply enough evidence for it.

Who gave the world Homeopathy?

We are told that Homeopathy was developed by the German physician Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843).But Indians know the principle long ago and are practising it in their day to day life.

The basic principles of Homeopathy are:

(1) ‘Like cures Likes’;

(2) ‘Symptoms of diseases are body’s self healing processes’ and

(3) ‘If one is administered with very dilute dose of what causes the disease, one will be cured of the disease’

When Hindus go to a holy place, they won’t drink or bathe in the water at once. Even when they go to temple tanks or holy rivers they will take three sips of water and sprinkle it on their head. Then they will use it for washing their feet and hands ,bathing etc. This small dose of three sips of water (Brahmins call it Achamana) will help them to avoid all the diseases from that particular water source. In those days, water was the main source of diseases. The mineral contents, temperature, taste and quality of water were different from place to place. There was no chlorination or protected water supply for the public. Even today one can practise this ‘achamanam’ and avoid getting diseases from water. The diluted water-in small quantity- gives immunity to us from the germs and other impurities. So Hindus know the principle of Homeopathy ‘Like cures Likes’. No need to say that we should remeber other basic rules about hygiene.

The rule for doing ‘achamana’ (sipping of water) is that the amount of water you take should submerge only one black gram seed (Urad Dhal in Hindi and Masha in Sanskrit). So when you do it three times you would have taken water that submerges only three seeds-so little. When Hindus did it they recite Lord Vishnu’s names: 1.Achyutaya Namaha 2.Ananthaya Namaha 3.Govindaya Namaha

Tamil book Tirukkural 1102 and Natrinai 140 also talk about this principle but in the context of a love sick woman’s look. “For the disease caused by this beautiful maid, she herself is the cure”-says Tirukkural. Like cures Likes!

What is the secret of black hair? 

Stress triggers or complicates most of the diseases is a modern discovery. But a Tamil Cankam poet called Pisiranthaiyar who lived 2000 years ago gives the secret of his black hair at a ripe old age in a beautiful Tamil poem.

When Pisiranthaiyar went to see the great Chola king Kopperun cholan (who was starving himself to death following an ancient Tamil rite) all were amazed to see an old poet without any grey hair. When they asked about the secret of his black hair, he sang;

“How can it be you don’t have any grey hair, through you have lived for many years?

You have asked the question and I will give you an answer!

My children have gone far in learning. My wife is rich in her virtue!

My servants do what I wish and my king, who shuns corruption, protects us!

And in my city there are many noble men who through deep knowledge, have acquired calm, have become self controlled, and the choices they make in their lives are built on the quality of restraint.”

-(Purananuru 191 by Pisiranthaiyar)

To put it in a nutshell:

My son is well educated

My wife is very cooperative

My servants are obedient

My king is a good ruler

My town is full of scholars

If one has all these, one need not worry. If you lead a care free life, you won’t get stressed. You will be ever young like Markandeya. Modern science says that stress triggers blood pressure, heart diseases, cancer and diabetes .

You are what you eat is in all our scriptures. Lord Krishna speaks in detail about the three kinds of food (Bhagavad Gita –chapter 17) and what qualities one gets from those. There is a beautiful saying as well:

“One fourth of what you eat keeps you alive and three fourths of what you eat keeps your doctor alive”

(From an Egyptian Inscription)

1,2,3,4 Out! 

Similar to this, there is a very good poem in he Tamil book ‘Neethi Neri Vilakkam’:

If one eats once a day he is a YOGI.

If anyone eats twice a day, that person is a BOGI (enjoyer of life)

If one eats three times a day, that person is a ROGI (sick person)

If one eats four times a day, that person is a Pogi (Tamil word for gone for ever/dead)

We know very well that indigestion is the root cause of all problems. Too much food leads to indigestion or obesity. This leads to other complications.

Tirukkural written by Tiruvalluvar has a full chapter (Chapter 95-Medicine) on the basic principles of Tamil medical science.

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