DECEMBER 2015 ‘GOOD THOUGHTS’ CALENDAR (Post No. 2361)

nataraja abishekam

Compiled by London swaminathan

Date: 25 November 2015

Post No. 2361

Time uploaded in London :– 16-51

( Thanks for the Pictures  ) 

 

Sanskrit Proverbs and sayings are taken from Suuktisudhaa, Publication of Chinmaya International Foundation.

Festival days: December 11- Poet Bharati’s Birth Day, 21 Vaikunda Ekadasi, 24- Miladi Nabhi, 25 Christmas, 26 Arudra Darsan.

Full moon – 25

New moon-11

Ekadasi: 7, 21 (Vaikunda Ekadasi)

Auspicious days: 6,7.

 

SRIRANGAM WITH TREES

DECEMBER 1 TUESDAY

The words of a powerful orator are in vain if he is hazy about the task at hand – Sisupalavadha 2-27

 

DECEMBER 2 WEDNESDAY

Words loaded with meaning can achieve all sorts of wealth — Subhasitaratna khandamanjuusaaa

 

DECEMBER 3 THURSDAY

Though insignificant, words spoken at the right time are indeed valuable — Subhasita ratna bhaandaagaara 3-758

 

DECEMBER 4 FRIDAY

The one whose speech is brief yet bewitching is alone a true orator –Subhasita ratna bhaandaagaara 2-8

 

DECEMBER 5 SATURDAY

The voice of the crowd – be they true or false – can tarnish one’s glory- Sanskrit Proverb

 

DECEMBER 6 SUNDAY

Avoid unpleasant arguments. So what if one is wicked?

 

DECEMBER 7 MONDAY

 

To the noble hearted, abuses are more astringent than arrows –Kahavatratnakar

 

DECEMBER 8 TUESDAY

Generally people are carried away by mere flowery eloquence Bharat Manjari 2-9-199

 

DECEMBER 9 WEDNESDAY

Sages maintain that the speech of the deluded and the arrogant are barbaric – Uttama Rama Carita

 

DECEMBER 10 THURSDAY

Soft speech is more cooling than even sandalwood and moonlight- Sanskrit Proverb

 

 

bharati photo (2)

DECEMBER 11 FRIDAY

Language identifies the region (desamaahyaati bhaasanam) Canakya Neeti 3-34

DECEMBER 12 SATURDAY

Of what use is the spoken after everything is put in black and white word? –Sisupalavadha 2-70

 

DECEMBER 13 SUNDAY

Competence and integrity are gleaned from the conversation – Hitopadesa 1-99 , SRB 3-452

 

DECEMBER 14 MONDAY

Prosperity and downfall are writ on one’s tongue (jihvaayattau vrddhi vinaasau)—Sanskrit Proverb

 

DECEMBER 15 TUESDAY

Well-wishers should be wary of provocative language –Kahavatratnakar

 

DECEMBER 16 WEDNESDAY

Words – minimal and meaningful – constitute eloquence –Kahavatratnakar and Naidadiyacarita

 

DECEMBER 17 THURSDAY

Words once ejected from one’s mouth spread rapidly everywhere – Kahavatratnakar

 

DECEMBER 18 FRIDAY

Use your words, only where they are honoured – Pancatantra

 

DECEMBER 19 SATURDAY

Who indeed is wretched when the veritable Goddess of Speech resides on one’s tongue?  –Subhasita ratna bhaandaagaara  (SRB)2-15

DECEMBER 20 SUNDAY

Eloquence makes for excellence (Vaagmitaa sreyasii mataa)—Sanskrit Proverb

 IMG_1143

DECEMBER 21 MONDAY

Who indeed can block the fluency of the eloquent? – Raja Tarangini 4-261

 

DECEMBER 22 TUESDAY

Who is not scorched by the painful hostility born of verbal duels? Katha Sarit Sagara

 

DECEMBER 23 WEDNESDAY

Embellished speech is the best ornament ever (Satatam Vaagbhuusanam bhuusanam) – Niti Sataka 16

 

DECEMBER 24 THURSDAY

It is considered that all ties originate in talks –Ragu Vamsa 2-58

 

DECEMBER 25 FRIDAY

Respect or disrespect is accorded according to one’s speech –Kahavatratnakar

 IMG_2988

DECEMBER 26 SATURDAY

Rare is that speech that appeals to one and all (sudurlabhaa sarva manoramaa girah)–  Kiratarjuniiya 14-5

 

DECEMBER 27 SUNDAY

Few syllabled pithy statements are supreme – Kahavatratnakar

 

DECEMBER 28 MONDAY

Rare is speech which is both salutary and charming – Kiratarjuniiya 1-4

 

DECEMBER 29 TUESDAY

Engaging, effortless conversation is the best travel snack – Brhat katha manajari

 

DECEMBER 30 WEDNESDAY

Utter not words of melancholy (maa bruuhi diinam vacah)—Sanskrit Proverb

 

DECEMBER 31 THURSDAY

Honey is in the tongue of bad people, but their heart is full of poison – Hitopadesam

 

dussehra-14

JANUARY 1 FRIDAY (2016)

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR.

 

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