Baffling Questions and Beautiful Answers in Spirituality –Part I

ramana drawing

Compiled by Santhanam Nagarajan

Post No:1800;  Date 15th April 2015

Uploaded from London at 8—15 am

Here is a new Question – Answer series for the benefit of all.

From time to time we have baffling questions.  But there is nobody to answer them.

But here is an effort to compile the answers from the great scholars, sages and saints of India.

01) Whether the person who attains Nirvana exists or not?

In fact when Lord Buddha was specifically put the question whether the person who attains Nirvana exists or not, Buddha refused to answer the question and later told his disciple, who asked him as to why he did not answer such a clinching question, that if he said he existed he would have to explain to him as to how he existed in the world and if he said he did not exist he would be confronted with the question as to why should one then bother himself about it at all.

Reference Book:-   Isavasya Upanishad – Kamakshi  Dasa

isavasya-upanishad

02) We find one sage advocating Bhakthi ( Devotion) another Gnana (Wisdom) etc. leading thus all sorts of quarrels? Why?

On 29th October 1945 (afternoon) Dilip Kumar Roy, singer and author, who is on a visit to Ramanashram from Sri Aurobindo Ashram, asked Ramana Maharishi, “According to the ‘Maha Yoga’ you say that the sages have not said anything to contradict each other.  Yet, we find one advocating bhakthi, another jnana, etc. leading thus to all sorts of quarrels.”

Bhagawan Ramana replied thus:

There is really nothing contradictory in such teachings.  When for instance a follower of bhakthi marga (Devotion Path) declares that bhakthi is the best, he really means by the word bhakthi what the jnana marga man calls janana.  There is no difference in the state or its description by attributes or transcendence of attributes.  Only different thinkers have used different words.  All these different margas, or paths or sadhanas (practices) lead to the same goal.  What is once a means becomes itself the goal.  When that happens, dhyana, bhakthi, or janana, which was at one time a conscious and painful effort, becomes the normal and natural state, spontaneously and without effort.

Day by day with Bhagawan  – From a diary of  A.Devaraja Mudaliyar