PANDU- TIGER AMONG MEN! (Post No.3697)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 6 March 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 10-42 am

 

Post No. 3697

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

Pandu was the father of Pancha (five) Pandavas in the Mahabharata. He was born to Ambalika and Vyasa. There is a big scientific truth in the birth story of Pandu. If any woman has sex with a man in disgust or hatred, the child born may be handicapped or sick or a baby with a rare syndrome.

 

Pandu’s older brother was Dhritarashtra who was born blind. Because of brother’s blindness Pandu took over the reins of the Kingdom. He was ruling from Hastinapura. He married Kunti, who chose him as her husband in a Swayamvara ( a princess choses her own husband in an open competition). Later he married Madri from Madra Kingdom. In the olden days, a king could marry as many princesses as possible from neighbouring kingdoms to strengthen the country and save it from invasions.

 

Kunti, taught Madri the mantra (magic spell) she learnt from Durvasa, a seer, to get children. Through that mantra she invoked the Vedic twins Aswini kumaras and got twins Nakula and Sahadeva. Yudhisthira, Bhima and Arjuna with these twins were called Pancha/Five Pandavas.

Science behind their births!

Vyasa was asked to help Amba and Ambika in getting children, since both had no issues. They couldn’t have children with their husband Vichitraveerya. This was an ancient custom allowed to continue the lineage. So, Vyasa agreed to produce children, but neither he was  a handsome man nor dresses properly. He was more involved in the Vedic studies. When Ambika looked at him she hated him and shut her eyes while she had conjugal bliss with him. Because of her mental state she gave birth to a born blind, Dhritarshtra. Ambalika also was not happy, but had sex with him with a feeling of disgust and the child born to her was pale, Pandu.

 

So, if someone doesn’t feel comfortable or happy while having sex, that will affect the children born to them physically or mentally. Western country statistics also show that children brought up in an atmosphere of violence, squalor, bad habits such as drink and drugs become anti-social elements.

 

How Pandu died?

Hunting and gambling were two big vices of Hindu kings. When Pandu went for a hunt in the forest he mistook a rishi and his wife as deer and shot and killed them. At that time they were having sex. Since Rishis (seers) of ancient India wore deer skin, they were easily mistaken. When the seer (Kindama) died, he cursed Pandu that he would also die when he has sex with his wife.

 

Pandu felt very sad and went to the forest to practice yoga and penance. Both his wives Kunti and Madri accompanied them. As fate, would have it, one day Pandu felt very happy and decided to enjoy conjugal pleasure. He died immediately and Madri also died with him in the funeral pyre, feeling that it was her fault to allow him to come closer to her despite the seer’s curse.

Kunti took care of her children.

Tiger among Men

Pandu did not get much coverage as others, outside the epic. But Mahabharata praised him very much. He had great qualities and he was used as similes in many passages Let us look at a few couplets about Pandu from the epic:-

 

“This tiger among men comes again, the knower of virtue, the one who protects us in accordance with what is right, as his own relatives”

ayam sa purusa Vyaagrah punar aayaati dharmavit

yo nah svaan iva daayaadaan dharmatah pariraksati ( 1-199-17)

 

“Pandu, while practising penance in the forest behaved like a brother to some, like a friend to others; the sages, however, protected him like their own son”

 

kesaam cid abhavad bhraataa

kesaam cid abhavad sakhaa

rsayas tv apare cai ‘nam

putravat paryapaalayan 1-113-3

 

Pandu, though a Kshatriya (king), he looked like an enlightened sage in the forest: brahma rsi sadrsah paandur – 1-111-4

 

He is one of the unsung heroes of Mahabharata.

 

—Subham–

 

 

 

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