MUSLIM INVASIONS STOPPED RATHA YATRA 32 TIMES (Post No.8230)

WRITTEN BY LONDON SWAMINATHAN

Post No. 8230

Date uploaded in London – 23 June 2020       

Contact – swami_48@yahoo.com

Pictures are taken from various sources for spreading knowledge; this is a non- commercial blog. Thanks for your great pictures.

tamilandvedas.com, swamiindology.blogspot.com

RATHA YATRA  FACTS

Puri is one of the Seven Sacred Cities of India. It is on the east coast of India. Everyday millions of RSS members pay their pranams/salutes to Puri ad other sacred objects, seven sacred cities and saints. Half baked people now and then say in social media that the ‘British United India’. The seven cities explode those myths.

Chariot procession of Puri is one of the largest crowd pulling festivals of India. English word ‘Juggernaut’ came from Jagannath of Puri. There are some unique features in Puri Ratha Yatra which is in the attached Hindustan Times News report. Even the tribal are deeply involved in this festival.

This year it has attracted more social media attention because of the Supreme Court Judgement banning the festival first and allowing it later under strict conditions.

Hare Krishna Movement spread the Ratha Yatra to all big cities around the world.

Here are some interesting facts:

NEWS REPORT FROM HINDUSTAN TIMES

The Jagannath Puri Rath Yatra, one of India’s biggest religious festivals, is underway on Tuesday (JUNE 23,2020) in the temple town PURI in Odisha amid the coronavirus pandemic.

About a million devotees converge in Puri during the festivities but this year people will not be allowed after the Supreme Court placed several conditions, including the imposition of a curfew in Puri during the festivities.

A three-judge bench, headed by Chief Justice of India SA Bobde, said in its order that each chariot would be pulled by not more than 500 people, including officials and police, and there has to be an interval of one hour between pulling of the chariots.

The Odisha government has imposed a 41-hour curfew in the temple town and started Covid-19 tests of 700 temple priests who would pull the three chariots.

PURI RATHA YATRA

Here is all about the Rath Yatra festival in Puri:

* Lord Jagannath, Lord Balabhadra, and Goddess Subhadra are usually worshipped in the sanctum of the famous Jagannath Temple in Puri. They are brought out of the temple every year on the second day of the third Hindu month of Asadha onto the Bada Danda street of Puri in three huge chariots accompanied by Sudarshana Chakra.

* The nine-day Rath Yatra, or the chariot procession, celebrates this annual journey of Lord Jagannath and his two siblings from the 12th-century Jagannath Temple to Gundicha Temple, 2.5km away. The Gundicha Temple is their aunt’s home.

* The rituals for Rath Yatra will begin at 3am inside the 12th-century shrine.

* The Pahandi ritual (procession) will begin at 7am and the deities will board the chariots at the Singha Dwara facing towards the Gundicha Temple by 10am. The Chherapahara ritual will be held at 11.30am. The chariots will be pulled thereafter at around 12pm.

* The three deities are taken in the massive wooden chariots weighing 85 tonnes each. After staying in Gundicha temple for nine days, the three deities come back to the Jagannath Temple on the 10th day in a return journey.

* Lord Jagannath’s chariot Nandighosa is 45.6 feet in height and has 18 wheels. The 45- feet chariot of Lord Balaram comes with 16 wheels and is known as Taladhvaja and Devadalana is Goddess Subhadra’s 44.6 feet chariot with 14 wheels.

* The chariots are built every year only from a particular type of tree.

* Thousands of devotees pull the chariots to their aunt’s temple, the Gundicha Temple. It is considered to be a good omen and is also believed to bring luck and success if one gets a chance to pull the chariots.

* The deities stay at the Gundicha Temple for nine days, after which they ride the chariots back to their Jagannath Temple, a journey known as Bahuda Jatra.

* The chariots on the way back stop at the Mausi Ma Temple or home of Lord Jagannath’s aunt. The deities are offered Poda Pitha, a special pancake which said to be the favourite of Lord Jagannath, at the Mausi Ma Temple.

* In the 425 years of the Rath Yatra, the event has been stopped 32 times, mostly during invasions.

* It was not held for the first time in 1568 when Kala Pahad alias Kala Chand Roy, a general of Bengal king Suleiman Kirrani, attacked the temple and pillaged the deities.

* The last time it could not be held was between 1733 and 1735 when Mohammed Taqi Khan, deputy governor of Odisha, attacked the Jagannath temple, forcing the shifting of the idols to Ganjam district.

FROM HINDUSTAN TIMES , 22-6-2020

TAGS — Puri, Rath Yatra, Ratha, Muslim invasions, juggernaut

JUGGERNAUT AND LORD JAGANNATH! (Post No.5251)

Compiled by London swaminathan

Date: 23 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London – 17-13  (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5251

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

What is the origin of the word Juggernaut?

Meaning in English dictionary:

Definition of juggernaut

 

1: a massive inexorable force, campaign, movement, or object that crushes whatever is in its path

  • an advertising juggernaut

 

  • a political juggernaut

2chiefly British a large heavy truck

xxx

 

 

Juggernaut is derived from Sanskrit word and modern North Indian languages such as Hindi:

Naut here is ‘nath’ Lord of the Universe (Jagath).

The compound jaganath, is a title of the Hindu god, Vishnu, especially in his eighth incarnation as Krishna.

 

Huge lorries are called juggernaut because the epithet of the deity had come in English to be associated with the enormously heavy chariot /rath which bears Jagannath in procession at the annual festival- rath yatra at the town of Puri in Orissa in north East India.

 

This has been reported by European travellers from 1321 CE and reports mentioned worshippers dying, crushed under the massive wheels.

 

Western observers’ usually disparaging accounts led to an immediate usage of juggernaut for any institution to which persons are ruthlessly sacrificed (OED 1933) before it was applied to a very large lorry for transporting goods by road, especially one that travels throughout Europe (Collins Dictionary 1979)

 

During the past 150 years, juggernaut served in a derogatory sense as a verb and an adjective as well as noun.

–Elenore Nesbitt, Senior Research Fellow Religious Education, University of Warwick

The Guardian Newspaper, Notes and Queries, Vol.5, Year 1994

 

My comments:

 

First it was used to do propaganda against Hindus by Christian missionaries. Slowly the dictionaries changed the meaning and made it milder and milder.

In fact not many people died in such Rath yatras. The crowd that gathers there is more than the population of several European and Pacific Ocean island countries.

Like they keep on changing the language of The Bible every year and now 200 different types of Bibles are available, the dictionaries also differ. Derogatory sense is left behind.

 

–SUBHAM–

 

 

 

The Story of ‘Juggernaut!’

Compiled by London swaminathan

Post no.1878, Date: 20 May 2015.

Most of us know that the word ‘juggernaut’ in the English dictionary is derived from Lord Jaganatha of Puri, Odisha.

If you look at Oxford Dictionary you will get two meanings:-

1.A very large Lorry/Truck

2.A large powerful force or institution that cannot be controlled

British News Paper The Guardian has published the following matter under its question and answer column (Notes & Queries, Vloume 5)

Question: What is the origin of the word Juggernaut?

Answer:

JUGGERNAUT is derived from Sanskrit and modern North Indian languages like Hindi ‘Naut’ here is Lord(nath) of the universe (jagat), the compound Jagannath, is a title for the Hindu god Vishnu, especially in his eighth incarnation as Krishna. Huge Lorries are called juggernauts because the epithet of the deity had come in English to be associated with the enormously heavy chariot (rath) which bears Jagannath in procession at the annual festival (Rathayatra) at the town of Puri (Jagannath Puri) in Orissa in North East India.

This has been reported by European travellers since about 1321 and reports mentioned worshippers dying, crushed under the massive wheels. Western observers’ usually disparaging  accounts led to an intermediate usage of juggernaut for any institution to which persons are ruthlessly sacrificed (OED 1933) before it was applied to ‘a very large lorry for transporting goods by road, especially one that travels throughout Europe’ Collins Dictionary of the English Language 1979). During the past 150 years, juggernaut served in a derogatory as a verb and an adjective as well as a noun.

–Eleanor Nesbit, Senior Research Fellow, Religious Education, University of Warwick.

Brewer’s Book of Myth and Legend add…

The chief festival is the car festival when Jagannath is dragged in his car (35 feet square, 45 feet high) to another temple. The car has sixteen wheels, each seven feet in diameter. The belief that fanatical pilgrims cast themselves under the wheels of the car to be crushed to death on the last day of the festival is largely without foundation. However it has led to the phrase the car of the juggernaut, used to denote customs, institutions etc., beneath which people are ruthlessly and unnecessarily crushed.

My comments: Actually the Christian missionaries published pictures of Jagannath Rath in bad light (throwing people under the wheels) and women thrown into husband’s funeral pyre etc. to justify their conversion agenda.