Eagle in the Rig Veda and Egyptian Civilization (Post No.3672)

Most Imporatnt Vahana of Vishnu Temples

 

Research Article Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 26 FEBRUARY 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 17-21

 

Post No. 3672

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

In the Rig Veda and the Egyptian literature Eagle or falcon was mentioned. Rig Veda is the oldest book in the world if we go by the dating of Herman Jacobi and BG Tilak.  Both used the astronomical data in the Veda independently and arrived at the same date, around 4500 BCE.

Picture of Eagle shaped Vedic Fire Altar

 

Hindus and Egyptians identified eagle or falcon with death and immortality. Both identified the bird with divinities and kingship. They praised the eagle or falcon sky-high. The beliefs were same.

 

In ancient Egypt, the falcon was a royal symbol, because the gaze was said to have paralyze birds as such the countenance of the Pharaoh his enemies. It was the manifestation of Sky God Horus, presumably because the bird flew so high.

 

Rig Vedic Reference:

Syena (eagle) is described as a strong bird in the Rig Veda (1-32-14; 1-33-2; 1-118-11; 1-163-1; 1-165-2; 2-42-2; 4-38-5 etc In the other Vedas lot of references are there.

Saghan is mentioned in Tattiriya Brahmana; it may be a vulture or an eagle.

Su-parna means well-winged and is mentioned in RV 1-164-20; 2-42-2; 4-26-4;8-100-8;10-48-3 etc

In the RV 4-26, 4-27 falcon is praised. But the full meaning is not explained in the translation. It may be the seed for later stories of Garuda and Amrita and Garuda and death and immortality.

(I am afraid there is no scholar at present to explain the significace of eagle in the Vedas. For example, there is one hymn addressed to The Falcon (4-27). No proper explanation is found in any book. Probably this is the only hymn addressed to falcon in ancient civilizations)

The Satapata Brahmana (12-2-3-7) praises eagle as Maha Suparna, i.e. Great Eagle

Roman eagle discovered in London Aldgate area.

In Rome

When Roman emperors were cremated ritually, an eagle was released above the funeral pyre to indicate that the soul has gone to dwell among the gods. One old Babylonian text tells us of the ascension of King Etana borne into the heavens by an eagle.

 

In fact, it is a Hindu belief. Hindus read the Garuda (Eagle) Purana during the 13 day mourning period after the death of a near and dear relative. Of the 18 major Puranas (Hindu Mythology), Garuda Purana is the only one that has got a special funeral liturgy called Pretakanda. Garuda (eagle) was the one who brought Amrita according to a Hindu story and so it symbolised immortality. Bird is always associated with the soul in Hindu literature.

 

Tamil Veda Tirukkural

Tamil Veda Tirukkural confirms it with a couplet:

The affinity of the body and the soul is like that of the nest and a bird in it. The soul departs from the body even as the chick deserts the nest – Tirukkural 338.

It is in Sangam Literature as well:

Tamil poet Kalladanar says in Akam 113:

“Oh, my friend! I won’t cry if my soul (life) leaves my body and goes to the place where my lover is working, like the bird that deserts its desolate nest and flies away”- said by a woman to her friend.

 

So, this is a Hindu concept of soul which is seen in many Hindu scriptures including Manu smrti and Bhagavad Gita with different similes.

 

Eagle is associated with Sun God in several cultures. In Palmyra in Syria, the eagle was associated with the Sun God.

Egyptian God Horus from Wikipedia

Garuda Vahana in Egypt

Horus is Sky god in Egypt recorded from 3000 BCE. Horus symbol is falcon, and he is generally depicted either wholly or in human form with a falcon’s head, exactly like Hindu’s Garuda Vahana.

Other divinities similarly portrayed were the Sun God Rue; Mentu, with adouble crown of feathers; Seker the god of the dead (as a mummified hawk); Hariese with the crown of Upper and Lower Egypt.

 

Horus is a form of the sun god. The alternative name Harakhti translates Horus of the horizon. He is sometimes depicted as a sun disc mounted between falcon’s wings. Kings are identified with Horus.

 

Horus as a baby on her mother Isis’ knee is as an amulet against snakes and other animals. In Hindu scriptures Garda mantra is used against snakes.

In many countries, such as Mexico, Thailand, Indonesia, India Garuda emblems are used.

The noticeable marking in the feathers under the hawk’s eyes is called Udjat-eye. This is Horus’ all seeing Udjat eye which became a symbol for visual acuity and imperviousness to injury as well as treasured amulet.

 

Assyrian Eagle Genie, 883 BCE (May be Garuda carrying amrita)

 

Christian World

Gothic windows portray the eagle carrying its unfledged young up into the sky to teach them to gaze into the sun. It figures in Norse mythology Odin. In Europe several saints have falcon as their symbol.

In Christian iconography, the eagle appears frequently as a symbol of  john the Evangelist, as an attribute of ascended phrophet Elijah and the resurrected Christ.

 

Quauhtli (eagle) is the 15th of the 20 days of the Aztec calendar. In ancient China it was the symbol of power and strength.

 

In Tamil Nadu, King Karikal Choza constructed an eagle shaped fire altar (Yaha Gunda) to perform a yaga according to Purananuru (verse 224). In Kerala even today eagle shaped fire altars are constructed for Atiratra  fire ceremony.

Eagle Vahana (Mount of God in processions) of Hindu temples

 

Eagle in Mahabharata similes

Bhima and Sikhandin wander about in the battlefield enraged like an eagle (6-78-28).

The Pandavas rush towards Jayadratha’s army as an eagle rushes towards meat (3-253-24)

The Pandavas and Kauravas fight like two  eagles fighting for meat (6-111-42)

I have already given the story of Garuda and Vinata as found in the epic.

 

Conclusion:

All ancient cultures used eagle, hawk and falcon as symbols of power and might.

But there are more similarities between Vedic and Egyptian cultures in attributing divinity to eagles.

Both identified eagle with Sun and Death and Immortality.

 

All other civilizations that used falcon and eagle have dies long ago and gone into museums. But the culture is still alive in Hindu India.

 

There are innumerable towns named after eagle and falcon; there are hundreds of temples where Eagle Vahana is use to carry Lord Vishnu’s idol.

 

Garuda is worshipped by villagers and sight of it is considered an auspicious sign.

Garuda Hymns and Mantra are used as anti-dotes for poison.

Rig Vedic hymns, the oldest in the world are still used!

 

(Please see below my previous articles on this subject)

 

Eagles fed at Tirukkazuku Kundram in Tamil Nadu Temple

 

Books used:

Rig Veda

Sangam Literature

Dictionary of Symbolism by Hans Biedermann

Encyclopaedia of Gods by Michel Jordan

Elements of Poetry in the Mahabharata

 

From my old article:

 

Hindu Eagle Mystery deepens, 16 February 2013

 

1.Why do Hindus worship eagle (suparna=garuda) from Rig Vedic Days till today?

2.Why do Hindus including the greatest Tamil king Karikal Choza built their Yaga Kundas (Fire altars) in eagle shape?

3.How is that two eagles come to Tirukazuku kundram just to eat rice pudding everyday for over 1300 year period?

4.Why do Hindus call Emeralds as Garuda Ratna (eagle gem), which Sindbad story writer copied it from the Hindus?

5.Why a Saivaite saint sang 1300 years ago about an eagle bringing flowers to Shiva every day?

6.Why do Tamil children shout ‘Drop me  a flower please’ when they see Garudas (falcon/eagle) in the sky? Why do Hindus recite a Sanskrit hymn when they see Garuda?

7.Why does Vishnu use Garuda as his Vahana (Mount of God)?

8.Why did Rama cremate an eagle Jatayu in Ramayana? Was it eagle totem people or real eagle? Why Tamils associate this with Vaitheeswarankoil (eagle town)?

  1. Why did Eagle people and Snake people (Garudas and Nagas) fight all over the world? We have the story here in Puranas, but symbols are in Egypt and Maya civilization?
  2. How come eagle brought Soma plant for the Yagas (Fire ceremonies of Hindus)?
  3. Why did a Greek build an eagle pillar with inscription calling himself as a great devotee of Vishnu?

  

Falcon symbols in Egypt

12.Tamil Encyclopedia Abithana Chintamani ( year 1899) attributes sixteen acts to Garudas. Many of them actually belong to people with eagle totem. They were against people with snake totem (Nagas). It is the ancient history of India. One must go deeper in to it to reveal the secrets.

  1. Why do women fast on Garuda Panchami day every year?
  2. Why is Garuda Purana is associated with the departed souls? It is read in the 13 day mourning period.
  3. Indus People painted eagle in (funeral ??)  potteries, Why? Has it anything to do with Hindus reading Garuda Purana after the funeral?
  4. Why is it that Amrita (ambrosia) is linked with Garuda/suparna?
  5. In the Assyrian bas-relief in Khorsabad (885 BC) Eagle headed  winged genie is carrying a vessel of lustral water and a pine cone sprinkler. It is one of the benevolent genies that protected men from diseases and evil forces. Is it Garuda with Amrita? (see the images)
  6. Why does Jaiminiya Brahmana (Vedic literature) say that eagle separates water from milk like Krauncha (swan) bird?
  7. Why does Romulus saw an eagle on the Aventine Hill and considered it as a good omen like Hindus and keep it in front of his army? Orthodox Hindus wait for Garuda Darsanam every day.

20.Why do newspapers report sighting of Garuda as a good omen during Kumbhabishekam or any religious event?

  1. Why does Krishna say that he is garuda/eagle among birds in Bhagavad Gita (10-30)(vainatheyascha pakshinam)? Western cultures also consider eagle as ‘King of Brids’.

If I write answers to all these questions it would become a big book. I am going to answer a few of these questions in this article.

(Please read the full article for more information)

…………………………..

I have already written about Vahanas, eagle shaped fire altars of Karikal Choza, Eagle Vs  Naga clans enmity in Mayan civilization, Double headed Eagle, Garuda Sthamaba of Greek Ambassador etc. Please see the titles of the articles given below:-

Double Headed Eagle: Sumerian-Indian Connection, posted on 18 December 2011

Picture of Double Headed Eagle in Turkey (Ganda Beranada Bird of Hindu literature)

 

Eagle/Garuda in India, Rome and Sri Lanka

25 September 2014

Karikal Choza and Eagle shaped Fire Altar

14 January 2012

A Hindu Story in Sumerian Civilization

11 May 2014

Eagle shaped fire altar at Vedic ceremony

–Subham–

ABOUT SIN: from Tamil and Sanskrit Literature! (Post No.3653)

Picture of Hell with sinners

 

Compiled by London swaminathan

Date: 20 FEBRUARY 2017

Time uploaded in London:- 11-05 am

Post No. 3653

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

A sin committed does not, like a cow, bear fruit soon; one sees it sons and grandsons, it not in oneself; a sin necessarily bears consequences like a heavy (indigestible) meal in the belly –Mahabharata 1-75-2

naa dharmas carito raajan sadyah phalati gaur iva

putresu vaa naptrsu vaa n aced aatmani pasyati

phalaty eva dhruvam paapam gurubhuktam ivo dare

-Mbh 1-75-2

 

Tamil Veda Tirukkural on Sin

 

There may be forgiveness for any sin but not for ingratitude (Tirukkural 110)

 

For those who harmed the cows, who did abortions, who harmed Brahmins, there is atonement; but for those who have been ungrateful, there is no atonement- Alathur Kizar in Purnanauru verse 34

 

Harming Brahmins is a sin: Puram34, 43

 

 

Deeds forbidden by the wise – who dare to do them? –even if they succeed, suffer grief and troubles (Tirukkural 658)

 

Though he sees his mother starving, let him not do those actions which are condemned by the wise (Tirukkural 656)

 

Never do a wrong for which you repent afterwards. Once done repeat it not (Tirukkural 655)

 

All profits, that make others weep, depart with tears. Even if lost, blessings flow from good deeds(Tirukkural 659)

 

Even in adversity, men gifted with an unfaltering vision, never do actions that are disgraceful (Tirukkural 654)

 

Picture 2 of Hell

 

Manu on Sins

 

Five Great Sins/ Pancha mahaapaataka

 

Killing of Brahmana- Brahmahatya

Consuming liquor- suraapaanam

Stealing- Steyam

Misbehaving with teacher’s wife- Gurvanga naagamah

Having association with the above – Samsargi

 

Brahmahatyaa suraapaanamsteyam gurvanganaagamah

Mahanti paatakaanyaahustasamsargi cha panchamah

–Manu smrti 11-54

 

If one mainly practises virtue [punya] and to a lesser extent vice [påpa], one obtains bliss in a heavenly realm, clothed with those very elements. 12:20.

 

But if one primarily practices vice and less virtue, one suffers, deserted by the elements, the torments inflicted by Yama. Having endured those torments of Yama, one again enters, free from taint, those very five elements, each in due proportion. 12:21-22.

 

He who has committed an offence and has repented, is freed from that offence, but he is purified only by [the resolution of] ceasing [to sin and thinking] ‘I will do so no more.’11:231.

 

He who, having either unintentionally or intentionally committed a reprehensible deed, desires to be freed from [the blame of it, must not commit it a second time. 11:233.

 

Having thus considered in his mind what results will arise from his deeds after death, one should always be good in thoughts, speech, and actions. 11:232.

 

The penances for transgressions [made public] have been thus declared according to the law; learn next the penances for secret [transgressions]. 11:248.

 

Sixteen suppressions of the breath [Prå±åyama] accompanied by [the recitation of] the Vyåhritis and of the syllable Om, purify, if they are repeated daily, after a month even the murderer of a learned priest. 11:249.

 

Even a drinker of [the spirituous liquor called] Sura becomes pure, if he mutters the hymn [seen] by Kutsa, ‘Removing by thy splendour our guilt, O Agni,’ &c., [that seen] by Vasishtha, ‘With their hymns the Vasishthas woke the Dawn,’ &c., the Mahitra [hymn] and [the verses called] Suddhavatis. 11:250.

 

Even he who has stolen gold, instantly becomes free from guilt, if he once mutters [the hymn beginning with the words] ‘The middlemost brother of this beautiful, ancient Hotri-priest’ and the Sivasaºkalpa sûkta. 11:251.

 

But if one fasts for three days, bathing thrice a day, and reciting [while standing in water] the Aghamarshana sûkta (Rig Veda10-190), is [likewise] freed from all offences causing loss of caste. 11:260. 5

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Picture of Punyaloka/Heaven

Sin in Bhagavad Gita

 

What pleasure can be ours, O Krishna, after we have slain the sons of Dhritarashtra? Only SIN will accrue to us if we kill these malignant.

Alas, what a great SIN have resolved to commit in striving to slay our own people through our greed for the pleasures of the kingdom.1-36, 45

 

But if thou doest not this lawful battle, then thou wilt fail thy duty and glory and will incur SIN.

Treating alike pleasure and pain,gain and loss, victory and defeat, then get ready for battle. Thus thou shall not incur SIN. 2-33, 38

But by what is a man impelled to commit sin, as if by force, even against his will, O Krishna? 3-36

The All pervading Spirit does not take on the SIN or the merit of any. Wisdom is enveloped by ignorance; thereby creatures are bewildered. 5-15

But those men of virtuous deeds in whom SIN has come to an end, freed from the delusion of dulaities, worship Me steadfast in their vows. 7-28

The gateway of this hell leading to the ruin of the soul is threefold, lust, anger and greed. Therefore, these three one should abandon 16-21

 

xxx

Man is never punished FOR his sins but BY his sins. To dissipate our energies through the sense organs is the vulgar hobby of the thoughtless mortal.

–Swami Chinmayananda

Sin and mercury are hard to digest- Ramakrishna Paramahamsa

xxxx

 

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Five Karma Candaalaah

 

Five lowest category of people are:

Atheist – naastikah

Wicked -pisunah

Ungrateful- krtaghnah

Sinner- dirgha dosakah

By birth- janmatah

Naastikah pisunashchaiva krtaghno diirghadosakah

Chatwaarah karmachandaalaa janmataschaapi panchamah

 

–Subham–

 

 

Perfume Simile in Hindu Literature (Post No.3639)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 15 FEBRUARY 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 19-19

 

Post No. 3639

 

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

 

Many of you would have read the famous quote of Shakespeare in Macbeth:

 

“Here is the smell of blood still. All perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.”

 

But the art of perfume making spread to various parts of the world from India. I have already written about the art of perfume making from Brhat Samhita of Varaha Mihira and Kamasutra of Vatsyayana. It is considered one of the 64 arts prescribed to all the women of ancient India. So there is no wonder we have some quotations and similes in our epics. here is one form Mahabharata:

As the perfume of flowers (in contact with them) scents clothing, water, sesame seed, or the ground, so qualities are born from contact (with the good or evil)

vastram aapas tilaan bhuumim gandho vaasayate yathaa

puspaanaam adhivaasena tathaa samsargajaa gunaah (Mbh 3-1-22)

 

In the olden days we mixed perfume with water, oil and used them.

In Tamil we have a proverb (Puuvoodu serntha naarum manam perum). Even the string that is used to make garlands gets the fragrance of the flowers. We use this to say that anyone who hasthe company of scholars will shine like the scholars.

 

There is another proverb saying that even the weaving tools in Kamban’s house will sing Ramayana!

Ramakrishna Paramahamsa says that if anyone has done good or bad that lingering smell will still be there. So one must be careful not to join the same group:-

 

“The cup in which garlic juice is kept retains the odour, though washed several times. Egotism is such an obstinate aspect of  ignorance that it never disappears completely, however hard you may try to get rid of it.”

 

Once a Marwari gentle man, approached Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and said, “How is it, Sir, that I do not see God although I have renounced everything?”

The Master: “Well, haven’t you seen leather jars for keeping oil? If one of them is emptied of its contents, still it retains something of the oil as well as its smell. In the same way there is still some worldliness left in you, and its odour persists.”

 

–Subham–

 

 

Nectar and Poison in Tamil and Sanskrit Books (Post No.3636)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 14 FEBRUARY 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 20-55

 

Post No. 3636

 

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

In Sangam Tamil Literature, which is 2000-year-old, Sanskrit word Amrita (nectar) is used in at least 40 places with three different Tamil spellings (amiztham, amirtham, amutham). Tirukkural, which belongs to the post Sangam period has at least three couplets with the word Amrita. Mahabharata which is several thousand years old has got interesting slokas on nectar and poison (Amrita and Visha)

 

Here are few similes on Amrita and Visha from Mahabharata:

 

yat tad agre visam iva

parinaame amrtopamam

tat sukha saatvikam proktam

aatma buddhi prasaadajam 6-40-37

 

That which is initially like poison (but) like nectar in maturity, that is called the saatvika happiness, born of serenity of soul and mind.

 

visayendriya samyogaad

yat tad agre amrtopamam

parinaame visham iva

tat sukham rajas am amrtam 6-40-38

 

That which is initially like nectar owing to contact of the objects of sense and the sense and the sense organs, but like poison in maturity, that is known as Rajasam happiness.

 

Vyasacompared Amritam with sweetness and extreme contentment, sweet fruits (3-155-44), water (3-152-22), an interesting story (1-90-5) and a consoling word (1-147-24).

 

Poison is compared with anger.

The sage’s son of hot temperament is likened to poison (visakalpa rseh sutah 1-36-23)

 

Yudhisthira is very much pained to remember the insult to Draupadi in the assembly; this painful insult is likened to the essence of poison.

duuve visaye va rasam viditvaa (3-35-17)

 

That great army of Dhrtaraastra), while destroyed in three battle field, displayed violent paroxysms like a man after having drunk poison) 6-79-23)

saa vadhyamanaa samara dhaartaraastri mahaacamuuh

vegan bhhuvidhaams cakre visam piitve va maanavah

 

Amrita in Tamil Veda Tirukkural:-

Tiruvalluvar, author of Tirukkural, used the word nectar in three couplets:-

“The food into which the children’s little hands have been dipped will be far sweeter to the parent than nectar” (64)

 

“ A discourse addressed to unsympathetic hostile ears is like poring sweet nectar into a filthy gutter” (720)

 

“Her arms are made up of nectar, for their touch revives my life whenever it occurs” (1106)

 

–Subham–

 

Prisoners: Barack Obama, Manu and Kalidas (Post No.3610)

Statue of Kalidasa in China

 

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 6 FEBRUARY 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:-  9-17 am

 

Post No. 3610

 

 

Pictures are taken from different sources; thanks.

 

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

 

Kalidasa refers to the release of prisoners on the eve of the coronation of a king (Raghuvamsa 17-19). Barack Obama, outgoing US President also did the same just before leaving the office. This custom was started in Hindu India thousands of years ago. But India was one step ahead of all the countries. They even gave freedom to birds and animals! Caged birds were released! Domestic animals were unharnessed according to Kalidasa.

बन्धच्छेदन् स बद्धानान् वधार्हाणामवध्यताम्।
धुर्याणान् च धुरो मोक्षमदोहन् चादिशद्गवाम्॥ १७-१९

bandhacchedan sa baddhānān vadhārhāṇāmavadhyatām |
dhuryāṇān ca dhuro mokṣamadohan cādiśadgavām|| 17-19

 

On coronation Atithi ordered the release of prisoners; cancelled death sentences of those who are condemned to it; released the beasts of burden from burden, and interdicted the milking of cows. [17-19]

 

 

क्रीडापतत्रिणोप्यस्य पञ्जरस्थाः शुकादयः।
लब्धमोक्षास्तदादेशाद्यथेष्टगतयोऽभवन्॥ १७-२०

krīḍāpatatriṇopyasya pañjarasthāḥ śukādayaḥ |
labdhamokṣāstadādeśādyatheṣṭagatayo’bhavan|| 17-20

 

Even the caged birds of amusement such as parrots and others having gained their freedom through his order and became free birds to go as they wished. [17-20]

 

(Raghuvamsa translation from sanskritdocuments.org)

Kautilya also says that the king releases all the prisoners in the newly captured country. They are released when there is a coronation or a new child is born to the king. The joy is shared by everyone. Death sentence is commuted or cancelled.

 

The king should have all the prisons built on the royal highway, where the suffering mutilated evil doers can be seen 9-288

 

Manu says a prisoner should be excluded from the ceremony for the dead (Manu 3-158)

 

A priest (Brahmin) should not eat the food of a man bound in chains prisoner) 4-210

 

Prisoners Release in America

 

President Obama granted commutations Tuesday to 79 federal drug offenders who were imprisoned under harsh and outdated sentencing laws, pushing to more than 1,000 the number of inmates who have received clemency from him.

Obama’s historic number of commutations — more than the previous 11 presidents combined — was announced as administration officials are moving quickly to rule on all the pending clemency applications before the end of the president’s term. The Trump administration is not expected to keep in place Obama’s initiative to provide relief to nonviolent drug offenders.

About a third of the 1,023 inmates who have been granted clemency, 342 prisoners, were serving life sentences for their ­offenses.

“The President’s gracious act of mercy today with his latest round of commutations is encouraging,” said Brittany Byrd, a Texas attorney who has represented several inmates who have received clemency since Obama’s initiative began in 2014.

“He is taking historic steps under his ground-breaking clemency initiative to show the power of mercy and belief in redemption. Three hundred and forty-two men and women were set to die in prison. The president literally saved their lives.”

Eighteen of the inmates granted clemency Tuesday were serving life sentences.

 

My old article:

Prisoners Rehab in Ancient India! (Posted on 23 March 2013)

–SUBHAM–

 

Drama, Puppet Show, Folk Theatre in Tamil and Sanskrit Literature (Post No.3608)

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Research article written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 5 FEBRUARY 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:-  15-52

 

Post No. 3608

 

 

Pictures are taken from different sources; thanks.

 

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

Literary references in ancient Tamil and Sanskrit literature show that the people of India had wonderful entertainment for at least 3000 years continuously. We have references to drama, folk theatre and puppet show from Bhagavad Gita to Tamil saint Manikkavasagar’s Tiruvasagam. Though Bharata’s Natyasastra is about dance and drama, it is interesting to see similes of dance and drama from the olden days.

 

Following are the references: –

iisvarah sarvabhuutaanaam hrddase’rjuna tisthati

bhraamayan  sarvabhuutaani yantraaruudhaani maayayaa _Bhagavad Gita 18-61)

Arjuna, God abides in the hearts of all creatures, causing them to revolve according to their karma by His illusive power as if they were mounted on a machine.

 

I think this is a reference to Puppet show. Puppeteers mount the puppets on a wheel or a circular disc and show them dance. In Indian puppet show the operator sits behind a white curtain on which the shadow of the puppets are projected from behind the screen.

Ramakrishna Paramahamsa used to say Ami Yantram and You are Yantri (I am a machine, You (god) are the operator.

 

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Adi Sankara in his Viveka Chudamani, says

yatsatyabhutam nijarupamadhyam

chiddhayanandamaruupamakriyam

tadetya mithyaavapurutsrujeta

sailuushavadveshamupssttamaatmanah (292)

 

That which is real and one’s own primeval Essence, that Knowledge and Bliss Absolute, the One without a second, which is beyond form and activity – attaining That, one should cease to identify with one’s false bodies like an actor giving up his assumed mask.

 

When the actor has played his part, he is simply a man. So the man of realization is one with Brahman, his real Essence.

false bodies: The gross, subtle and casual bodies, which are super impositions upon the Atman.

(Translation of Vevekachudamani by Swami Madhvananda, Advaita Ashrama, Calcutta)

 

Sangam Tamil Literature

In Purananuru verse 29, Mudukannan Sattanar says, “Oh King, our life is like dance drama where the actors come and dance and go. (The life is so impermanent)”

 

Tiruvalluvar, author of the Tamil Veda Tirukkural refers to the drama in three couplets:-

 

“Fortune coming to one and its departure are likened to the assembling of a crowd to witness a drama and its dispersal respectively” (332)

 

“The men who do not possess sensitiveness to shame in their hearts are like the wooden dolls operated by strings (puppets)” (`1020)

 

“The great cool world will be  moving like a lifeless puppet show if none asks for help” (1058)

In later Tamil and Sanskrit literature, we have lots of similes for puppets shows.

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Manikkavasagar’s Tiruvasagam

Tamil saint Manikkavasagar who lived 1500 years ago also used the Sanskrit word Nataka (drama) in three places:

In the Tirusatakam song of Tiruvasagam, he refers to drama in three places (verses 11, 15 and 99)

In verse 11, he sings about the dance of Siva n the crematorium with the ghosts.

 

Amidst your devotees, I acted like one of them

to gain entrance (to get leberated) –15

 

and in 99

Thou Whom the lords of heaven themselves know not!

Thy source and end the Vedas cannot trae!

Thou Whom in every land men fail to know

As Thou hast sweetly made me Thine hast called

This flesh to dance on stage of earth

me to enjoy Thyself with melting soul

in mystic drama , too, hast caused to move

pining on earth, Thou Lord of Magic power.

 

Of virtue void, of penitential grace

devoid, undisciplined, untaught

As leathern puppet danced about, giddy,

I whirling fell, lay prostrate there!

-643

(Souce: The Tiruvacagam by Rev. G U pope, Oxford, 1900)

 

Dhammapada

Buddha says in Dhammapada (147), “Consider this body! A painter puppet with jointed limbs, sometimes suffering and covered with ulcers,full of imaginings, never permanent, forever changing.(147)

 

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Last but not the least is Shakespeare whose quotation on world as a drama theatre has become a very popular quote:-

 

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

–As You Like It

 770d1-dance2bof2bsix

Conclusion

Drama and Puppet show were so popular that even Krishna and Buddha used them as similes.

Every town had a drama or puppet show on Hindu religious them during the local temple festival. It continued until recent days.

Most of the drama quotations are from religious sources which show the nature of the puppet shows and dramas.

Even before Shakespeare made this theme popular, Hindus used it to show the instability and impermanence of life and its pleasures.

World is a drama theatre and we all players!

 

–Subham–

 

 

 

 

Custom of Garlanding and Flower Giving in Tamil and Sanskrit Literature (Post No.3550)

Giving Flowers to a woman began in India.

 

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 16 January 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 21-06

 

Post No.3550

 

 

Pictures are taken from different sources; thanks.

 

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

 

Garlanding statues of Gods and leaders, garlanding visiting dignitaries are common sights in India. Exchanging garlands is a marriage ritual as well. Giving flowers to women, offering flowers to Gods are also an everyday sight in India. All these started with the Hindus thousands of years ago according to Sanskrit and Tamil literature.

 

Jayamala ceremony is part of a marriage in North and South, showing Indian culture is one.

In my article FLOWERS IN TAMIL CULTURE posted on 25th August 2012, I have dealt with the Flower vendors in Sangam Tamil Literature, Kapilar’s listing of 99 flowers, Tamil classification of flowers, Tamil’s obsession with flowers even in the wars, 27 leaves to God Vinayaka, Famous Andal garland of Srivilliputtur, Onam Pukkolam and Pushpanchali.

 

Garlands are used from the Swayamvara (A princess choosing a King as her husband by garlanding) days.

 

Giving flowers to women was also started by the Hindus at least 2000 years ago. Let me give some examples from Kalidasa’s works:-

 

In the most famous drama of Sakuntala (Act 7-1), we read about garlands:

“Glancing up with a smile at Jayanta, his son

who stood beside him longing inwardly for the same,

Hari placed around my neck the Mandara garland

tinged with golden sandal rubbed off his chest”

 

 

 

In the Kumara Sambhava (3-22), the Master’s command is imagined to be a garland offered as a gift of favour.

In the Raghu vamsa (18-29)the king was, as it were, the crest garland of his race suggesting thereby the marks of a good rule.

The Love god whose energy had diminished with the departure of spring seems to be regaining his vim and vigour through the head hair of pretty women, for they are letting it loose after a bath aesthetically, per-fumigating it tastefully, and slicing evening jasmine flowers pleasingly. [16-50]

 

(Kiraataarjuniiyam also has a reference).

 

 

In the Raghuvamsa (6-80), Indumati’s glance itself was like the Swayamvara garland to Aja. The flowers in the garland were fresh and white and her steady glances were also white.

Keeping flowers in the ear or just above the ear is also mentioned in Kalidasa:-

Meghaduta. – 28, 67

 

“Where women toy with a lotus held in hand

twine fresh jasmines in the hair

the beauty of their faces glows pale gold

dusted with the pollen of lodhra flowers

fresh amaranth blooms encircle the hair-knot

a delicate Sirisa mestles at the ear

and on the hair parting lie Kadamba blossoms

born at your coming (verse 67, Megaduta)

 

Sakuntala : 1-4; 1-30; 6-18; in the prologue as well.

 

Raghu.7-26; 9-28, 9-43, 16-62

In the Tamil literature

Flower or tender plant in the ear:

Kurinjip paattu (Kapilar) 119-120

Tiru murukku-(Nakkirar)-30-31; 207

Paripaatal – 11-95; 12-88

 

GIVING FLOWERS TO A WOMAN

Kuruntokai belongs to Sangam period. The very first verse is about a man giving flowers to a woman he loves. It is sung by Tiputolar.

 

Natrinai, part of 2000 year old Tamil Sangam Literature, describes the garland worn by a man who came to see his lady love. He came wearing a garland made up of wild jasmine flowers and Bilva (Vilvam) leaves. Kalidasa also mentioned jasmine flowers in the hair of women. It showed that there was only one culture from the southern most part to the Northern Himalayas.

 

one of the verses in Marutham genre describes that when the farmers go to the fields, heroines (women) get flowers and garlands.

Natrinai verse 173 says that the women gathered flowers and made into a garland for Lord Skanda. She did it to so that her lover would marry her soon.

Purananuru verse 106 by Kapilar mentions that god wont reject even leaves and grass offered, reflecting the Bhagavad Gita verse 9-26 (Patram pushpam phalam toyam……)
This flower giving and garlanding is another proof to show that Indian culture is one from south to north and the Aryan-Dravidian Race theory is a fake one. No ancient culture has this flower culture.

–Subham–

 

Causes of Destruction: Woman and Brahmin (Post No.3541)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 13 January 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 21-44

 

Post No.3541

 

 

Pictures are taken from different sources; thanks.

 

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

 

What causes one’s destruction? Sanskrit scholars (Pundits) have a list; they have compiled the list out of past experience. I am pretty sure we can find lot of examples for each category.

 

Vinaasahetavah (causes of destruction):

Strii – ruupam = woman is destroyed by her beauty.

Chittoor Rani Padmini is a good example; her beauty made Aaludin Khilji to invade the Rajput Kingdom and she had t jump into fire along with her friends to save her honour.

Brahmana-rajaseva = Brahmins by service to the king

Nanda vamsa kings are typical xamples; they ridiculed all the Brahmins including Chanakya; first the Brahmins suffered at the hands of the Nava Nandas and then Chanakya destroyed them. Parasurama’s clash with kshatriyas is also famous

 

Gavah duurapracaarana= Cows by grazing distant field

Many of the village disputes are due to the cows grazing someone else’s field, usualy away fom one’s own field.

 

Hiranya lobhalipsaa – Gold by greed; here gold stands for all sorts of wealth. Most of the non violent prisoners are jailed because of their greediness.

Strii vinasyati ruupena braahmano raajasevayaa

Gaavo duuraprachaarena hiranyam lobhalipsayaa

–Subhasita ratna bhadaagaaram 153/19

 

Garuda Purana also has a similar couplet (sloka):-

ruupena strii = woman by beauty

krodhena tapah = penance by anger

duuraprachaarena gaavah = cows by distance gracing

ksudraannena dvijaah = Brahmins by eating unhygienic food.

 

Striyo nasyanti ruupena tapah krodhena nasyati

Gaavo duuraprachaarena kshudraannena dwijottamaah

Garuda Purana 115-7

 

xx x

Causes for the Fall of Brahminhood: Manu

Viprasya naasahetu

Veda- anabhyaasa = not learning the Vedas

Acaaravarjana = abandoning the codes of conduct

Aalasya = lethargy

Annadosa = disrespect for food

 

anabhyaasena vedaanaamaachaarasya sa varjanaat

aalasyaadannadoosaaccha mrtyurvipraandhaamsati

–Manu Smrti 5-4

 

Source Book: Encyclopaedia of Numerals (Volume 1)

The Kuppuswami Sastri Research Institute, Chennai 600 004, Year 2011

 

Pearl is available from Twenty Sources! (Post No.3538)

a6727-nose_ring_wikipedia

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 12 January 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 20-20

 

Post No.3538

 

 

Pictures are taken from different sources; thanks.

 

 

contact:  swami_48@yahoo.com

Tamil literature lists 20 places as the sources of pearls . Biologists know only one place where pearl is born. Sanskrit literature lists only eight places but these are not scientifically proved.

Twenty places according to Tamil verse from Uvamana Sangraham and Rathina Surukkam:
Oysters
Horn of elephant/tusk
Horn of boar

Bamboos

Areca nut Tree

Special Type of Banana Tree

Chalanchalam (Rare Type of right whorld Chank

Hear of Fish

Head of Crane

Lotus

Neck of women

Sugar cane

Paddy

Snake (cobra)

Clouds

Iguana

Moon

Chanks

Head of a crocodile
Teeth of cows

Varahamihira lists the following eight places in his Brhat Samhita:-

 

Following is from 2015 post: “Eight Types of Pearls: Varahamihira’s 1500 year old Price list”

17f95-pearl-large

Pearls are produced by:

Elephants, Oysters, Snakes, Clouds, Chanks, Bamboos, Whales, Boar (Brhat Samhita, Chapter 81)

Pearls come from eight areas

 

Simhalaka (Sri Lanka), Paraloka (Travancore coast), Surashtra (Gujarat), Tampraparani River (in South Tamil Nadu), Parasava (Iran), a Nothern country, Pandya vataka and the Himalayas.

Kautilya’s Artha Shastra (Third Century BCE) mentioned Pandya Kavata pearl. Fahien (399-414 CE) mentioned Simhala/Sri Lankan pearls.

Paraloka is a confusing term. There is one river called Parali in Kerala and there is an island Parali in the Lakshadweep. But the interesting thing is that itself sounds pearl in Tamil (Paral in Tamil is pearl in English and this town name is Paral+i).

Elephant Pearls:

 

Pearls are also obtained from the head and tusks of Bhadra class of elephants, says Varahamihira. But Varahamihira makes it clear that he repeats what the ancients believed about the elephant pearls. (This means they are not found even in Varahamihira days who lived around 510 CE)

He speaks about the pearls found in Boar tusk, Whales etc. Then he gives details about the pearls that are found in the seventh layer of winds. But the heaven dwellers will catch them before it falls on to earth!

Then he categorises Nagaratna as pearls. If the kings wear Nagaratna pearls enemies will be destroyed and his reputation will increase.
Kalidasa speaks of pearls from the head of elephants

xxx

From my 2012 post “Gem Stones in Kalidasa and Sangam Literature”

 
Pearl in the Oyster

 

If the rain falls on Swati star day the oysters open their mouth to drink the rain drops and the rain drops become pearls-This was the belief of ancient Indians including Tamils.
Bhartruhari and Sangam Tamil literature say that the pearls are created by the oysters on a particular day,I.e. The oysters open their mouths when there is rain falling down on a day under the star Swati(one of the 27 stars ). Biologists say that the sand particles that enter the living oysters secrete a liquid which covers the irritant to become a pearl.
Malavi.1-6: Kalidasa says , ‘the skill of a teacher imparted to a worthy pupil attains greater excellence, as the water of a cloud is turned in to a pearl in a sea shell.In Puram 380 ,Karuvur Kathapillay says the same about the origin of pearls. Bhartruhari makes it more specific by saying the rain on Swati Nakshatra days become pearls. Biologits also confirm on full moon days lot of sea animals like corals release their eggs or spores. So far as India is concerned it might have happened in that particular (Swati star with Moon) season.

Kalidasa gives more similes about pearls. He describes the river that is running circling a mountain as a garland of pearls ( Ragu.13-48 and Mega.-49)

Other references from Kalidasa: sweat drops as pearl:Rtu.6-7; tears as pearls: Mega 46, Ragu VI 28,,Vikra V 15; smile-KumarI-44, water drops on lotus leaf:Kumara VII 89

 

Pearls obtained from the head of elephants:Kumarasambhava 1-6, Raghu.9-65; In Tamil literature: Murugu 304, Malaipadu 517, Puram 170Natri.202, Kurinchi.36, Akam.282 etc.

 

In Tamil the teeth are compared to the pearls: Ainkur. 185, Akam 27

Since Gulf of Mannar is the main source of pearls in India ,thre are innumerable references to pearls in Tamil literature. Even Kautilya refers to the pearls from Pandya country. Korkai was the harbour city where the pearl fishing was flourishing. Aink 185,188, Akam 27,130 and Natri 23mention pearls from Korkai.

(for more information, go to  the two articles mentioned  by me

–Subham–

 

Bull Fighting in the 1890s (Post No.3523)

Compiled by London swaminathan

 

Date: 7 January 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:-  20-41

 

Post No.3523

 

 

Pictures are taken from different sources; thanks.

 

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

 

 
“There are several other kinds of amusement, some of them of a vulgar character, Bull fighting is one of them.

The bull fighting must not be regarded as like the familiar bull-fighting in Spain, or any other western country. This fight is called ‘sallikattoo’, and takes place during the day.

 

A large plain is chosen for the purpose and the villagers collect money among themselves with which to meet the necessary expenditure. They send out invitations to the people of other villages and inform them of the fixed day for bull-fight. This news spreads abroad among all classes of the people who come in numbers in bands and parties, both men and women to the spot appointed. The people of the village who have arranged the bull fight erect temporary sheds at their own cost in order to accommodate their visitors. As it is a public meeting place, the sellers of various articles flock to it with their different kinds of goods.

At about eight O clock in the morning all assemble in the plain. Sometimes there are thousands of people met on such occasions. Several fighting bulls will be brought by the villagers from different districts. The owner of each bull ties a new cloth around its neck. In  some cases the owner puts money in a corner of the cloth. He takes the bull to the headman of the assembly and bows his head to him. Then the headman inquiries concerning the parentage and name if he does not happen to know him. Then be asks the herald or the crier to beat his drum three times. This is a sign for the people to understand that a fighting bull will be let loose in the midst of the assembly. This is a signal also to the men who have come to fight the bull, and take the cloth and the money its neck that they must hold themselves in readiness. The owner of the bull takes him to the centre of the assembly, and there be lets him loose by warning the bult to take cate of and to make his way through the crowd to his shed.

 

As soon as ever the bull is set free, ten or fifteen men come to the front of the assembly without either stick or knife, and they face the bull manfully. Some of the clever bulls defend themselves hours together, hurting many of those men, and sometimes killing one or two; at last they escape from their hands and go home, leaping and frisking for joy. There are many bulls who are known to be great fighters and who allow anyone to take the cloths from their necks. Whoever takes the cloth considered to be a is hero. The bullocks are brought in to fight, one after another, the whole day through, and sometimes this terrible struggle between man and beast will be continued for two or three days. Some of the owners of the bulls offer a large sum of money to anyone who can arrest their bulls before the assembly.

 

These beasts are very knowing and clever in their fighting; they stand quietly before the assembly, and do not run or jump but if anyone approaches them, they hit him with their horns or legs as quickly as a flash of lightning. The people who come to witness the fight occupy the ground for half a mile in a crescent form. Some will sit and some will stand, just as they may please, and most of them will be exposed to the wind and the sun; but this they consider as nothing compared with the pleasure they derive from watching the bull-fight. The public do not pay a penny on occasions of this kind.

 

–Subham–