Truth may be blamed, but cannot be shamed! (Post No.5218)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 14 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London – 20-19 (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5218

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

More  Proverbs on Truth!

Truth and oil are ever above!

Truth is always visible; perceivable. No one can hide it. It stands out.

In Tamil there is a proverb, you can never hide a whole pumpkin in the cooked rice. White pumpkin grown in Tamil Nadu is of the size of four foot balls. (Tamil-Muzup puusanikkaayai sotril maraikka mudiyaathu)

Truth needs not many words.

A liar must concoct a big story. To justify one lie another lie is added. From a mole hill a mountain is created. But with the truth, just the facts will do the work.

Truth may be blamed, but cannot be shamed.

We normally attribute all our failures to something. It may be a fact, but it wont justify our action.

A poor man says that he stole something because of poverty or starvation.

A prostitute may say that she entertains people because she needs money.

So one may blame the truth but it can never be shamed. That is the real fault lies somewhere no on truth.

Tamil poet Tiruvalluvar’s Tamil Veda Tirukkural says,

Even it be to save your own beloved mother from starvation, let not your hands be defiled with what the sages have condemned as a heinous wrong.(656)
xxx


1.Many a true word is spoken in jest

2.In wine there is truth

3.Children and fools speak the truth

These three proverbs are very interesting.

Drunken men, children and fools speak the truth!

Even saint Rama Krishna Paramahamsa said this: “Heaven sometimes speaks through the mouths of lunatics, drunkards and children”.
xxx

1.Nothing hurts like the truth!


2.Truth finds foes, where it makes none

3.All truths are not to be told

4.Follow not truth too near the heels, lest it dash out thy teeth.

 

Tamil poet Thiruvalluvar and Manu, the law maker agree on this point.

 

Tamil Veda Tirukkural says,

What is truthfulness? It is the utterance of such words that smack not of even slightest taint of evil (Kural 291)

Manu says

In a case where telling the truth would cause the death of a servant ,Sudra or a ruler/Kshatriya or a Brahmana, one should tell a lie, for that is better than the truth- Manu Smrti 8-104

If it will produce pure, unmixed good, even falsehood may be considered truth — Tirukkural, 292

satyam bruyat priyam bruyat na bruyat satyam apriyam
priyam ca nanrutam bruyat esha dharmah sanatanah

Speak truth in such a way that it should be pleasing to others. Never speak truth, which is unpleasant to others. Never speak untruth, which might be pleasant. This is the path of eternal morality, sanatana dharma (Manu Smrti 4-138)

xxx
Lies have short legs

Liars have need of good memories

Great talkers are great liars. (Think about our politicians)

It is a well known fact that one lie must be supported by another lie. They will expose themselves. They cannot last long.
xxx
A liar is not believed when he speaks the truth

All of us know the famous fable. A villager always called everyone for help saying Tiger is comin, Tiger is coming; When all the villagers ran for his help he mocked at them as fools. Oe day when he was really attacked by tiger he raised the same slogan and no one came for his help. The consequence is obvious.

One lies make many

Murder will be out ( cannot be hid)

A traveller may lie with authority.

Lying and thieving go together.

xxx

It is true that all men say.

If many honest impartial voice their opinion and if it is the same, then there must be truth in it. One doesn’t need to worry about common man.

 

Tamil Veda Tirukkural says,

the arrogant fool, who denies what all the world firmly believes

will be considered a veritable demon stalking the earth- kural 850
xxx
Common fame is seldom to blame

Paper won’t blush 

 

I have already given Sanskrit proverbs on Truth in an article.

Please read my earlier posts.

–Subham–

HINDU BRONZES IN COLOMBO MUSEUM (Post No.5211)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 12 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London – 15-42  (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5211

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

 

COLOMBO MUSEUM IN SRI LANKA HAS GOOD BRONZES OF Lord Nataraja and Tamil saints Appar, Sundarar, Sambandar and Maniikavasagar. Parvati’s statues and Kathirgama Karthikeyan are also remarkable pieces.

 

Following are some good bronzes:

NATARAJA, DANCING SIVA

SIVA WITH FOUR HANDS

SIVA AND VISHNU WITH SRI AND BHU DEVIS

 

SUNDARAMURTHI NAYANAR, TAMIL SAINT

TAMIL SAINT MANIKKAVASAGAR IN THE CENTRE

TAMIL SAINT APPAR IN THE CENTRE

PARVATI

SIVA, SAMBANDAR, PARVATI

KATHIRGAMA DEVA KARTIKEYA

HANUMAN

–subham-

 

Interesting Life Story of Bhartruhari and Bhadragiriyar! (Post No.5210)

Bhartruhari meeting his former wife; Mogul painting

 

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 12 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London – 7-46 am  (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5210

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

Bhartruhari    is a popular name in Hindu literature. But there were many poets and kings with the same name . One Bhartruhari  was a grammarian. Another Bhartruhari  was a poet and author of 300 verses Niti Catakam, Srngara Catakam and Vairagya Catakam. He lived in fifth century CE

The latest one lived around tenth century who was the contemporary of famous Tamil devotional poet Pattinathar. This Bhartruhari  composed Bhartruhari or BHADRAGIRI pulampal in Tamil, that is lament of Bhartruhari.

Whoever it was there is an interesting story who became the subject of folklore in Chattisgarh and Rajasthan. He was the disciple of Saint Goraknath.

The hero of our story is linked with king Vikramaditya. That name is also confusing. There were many Vikramadityas in India and the most famous one lived 2200 years ago
His wife name was Pingala and she repented for her mistake. Later he came to her on his travel to holy places with his followers. That meeting became the subject of Moghul paintings and folklore. The story changes from place to place.

 

Throughout India the beggar minstrels sing the wistful melodies of with the ever recurring refrain about the impermanence of life. They say neither the body nor the wealth last for long. They very often refer to Bhartruhari. Whether it is the name of the saint or grammarian or the poet who wrote 300 verses on Love, Peace and Renunciation is of historical interest.

 

Tradition says that the happy king or poet was metamorphosed by the inconstancy of his wife Pingala. Two pictures here show that Bhartruhari coming to beg alms from his erstwhile wife. He left her after an incident which showed that she loved someone else who loved someone else. We see a love triangle in the story. After becoming an ascetic, he got the name Gopichand and he met his penitent wife. In the picture, we see Bhartruhari accompanied by some wandering friars and his former wife with half a dozen attendants. They are on the banks of a stream with beautiful natural scenery.

A fruit that which gives long life was presented to Bhartruhari by a Brahmin.

He gave to his youngest wife Pingala

Pingala gave to her secret lover- a police officer- Mahipala

Mahipala passed it to his beloved Lakha

Lakha who fell in love with the king passed it to Bhartruhari, the king.

 

This awakened Bhartruhari and he abdicated the throne to his brother Vikramaditya of Ujjaini.

 

The confusion here is no one knew which Vikramaditya and which Bhartruhari.

 

Any way the message is clear—Impermanence of Life which is a popular theme in all ancient Sanskrit and Tamil hymns.

Here is the Tamil version
His name is Bhadragiri. He met Pattinathar, a merchant turned ascetic. Tamil history says he was a king and became an ascetic. His verses are called Bhadragiriyar lament (pulampal in Tamil). In some places, he imitates Tamil poets Tirumular and Pattinathar. It is a philosophic poem. He was against caste. He quoted Kapilar Ahaval. Bhadragiri was praised by a later poet Ramalinga Swamikal.
 

–subham–

 

See You Later, Alligator!(Post No.5208)

Compiled by London swaminathan

 

Date: 11 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London – 14-48  (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5208

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

Extravagance Anecdotes

 

Poor Benjamin Franklin


After 150 years the truth is out about Benjamin Franklin. The name Poor Richard might easily have derived from his bank account rather than from his almanac, said William Fulton Kurtz after reading early records of the bank of North America, where Franklin and many of his illustrious compatriots kept their money. He was overdrawn at least three days out of every week.

Xxxx

Expense or Will?

When EH Harriman, the railroad magnate and millionaire, was dying, reporters were on the spot for the story. The reporter of one of the metropolitan dailies was notorious for his enormous expense accoun s. After the millionaire’s death, the reporters expense account carefully itemised but out of all just proportions, was handed over to the city editor. He looked it over and handed it back, saying,
“If this is the will, it is worth a story”.

Xxx

Generosity anecdotes

 

Let me Die First.
When Frederic the Great was seized with his mortal illness, he asked whether it was necessary to forgive all his enemies. On receiving the proper answer. He said to the queen,” Dorothy write to your brother that I forgive him all the evil he has done me; but wait till I am dead first”.

Xxx

Vote for my Opponent!

Abe Lincoln was a simple man with honest generous impulses. When he was a candidate for the legislature it was the practice at that date in Illinois for two rival candidates to travel over the district together. The custom led to much good natured raillery between them.

 
On one occasion he had driven out from Springfield in company with a political opponent to engage in joint debate. The carriage, it seems, belonged to his opponent. In addressing the gathering of farmers that met them, Lincoln was lavish in praise of the generosity of his friend.
“I am too poor to own a carriage, he said. But my friend has generously invited me to ride with him. I want you to vote for me if you will but if not then vote for my opponent for he is a fine man.

Xxx

ALLIGATOR OR IMAGINATION!

Imagination anecdotes
Professor Buckland, the distinguished biologist of the early 19th century, gave a dinner one day, after dissecting a Mississippi alligator.
How do you like the soup? asked the doctor after finishing his own plate, addressing a famous gourmand of the day

.
Very good indeed, answered the other; turtle, is it not?
I only ask because I do not find any green fat.
The doctor shook his head.
I think it has some what musky state, said another.
Not unpleasant but peculiar.
“All alligators have”, replied Dr Buckland, “the fellow I dissected this morning, and whom you have just been eating.”
There was a general rout of guests.
Everyone turned pale.

Half a dozen started up from the table and hurriedly left the room.
“See what imagination is!” exclaimed Dr Buckland.

 

“ If i had told them it was turtle or terrapin, or birds nest soup, they would have pronounced excellent”.
Tell me, doctor, was it really an alligator?
Alligator! Laughed the Doctor. Stuff and nonsense — it was nothing but a good calf’s head.
Xxxx Subham xxx

Hindu Treasures in Moscow Museum (Post No.5207)

Compiled by London swaminathan

 

Date: 11 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London – 8-37 am  (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5207

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

 

The following sculptures, paintings, wood carvings are from Moscow Museum; they depict Hitopadesa/ Panchatantra story (Crane and Crab), graceful women from Gujarat, Wayang puppet of Hindu epics Ramayana and Mahabharata, Mahabharata war, Sarasvati from Burma, Mandala from Buddhism, Rama-Hanuman carving in teakwood, Kubera and Urvasi-Pururuvas story of Rig Veda. There are many more treasures from South Asian and South East Asian countries. They are copied from the book.

 

SARASVATI FROM MYANMAR/ BURMA

DREAM OF MAYADEVI ABOUT BUDDHA’S BIRTH

HINDU THEMES IN BALI FOLDING SCREEN

CRANE AND CRAB STORY FROM PANCHATANTRA

 

WOMEN FROM GUJARAT

 

KUBERA- LORD OF TREASURES

MANDALA FROM BUDDHISM

 

RAMA AND HANUMAN ON TEAK WOOD CARVING

 

URVASI AND PURURUVAS- STORY FROM RIG VEDA.

 

WAYANG PUPPETS OF INDONESIA WITH HINDU EPIC CHARACTERS – SUBHAM-

A STORY ON HOSPITALITY-RIG VEDA AND PERIYA PURANA (Post No.5204)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 10 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London – 14-24   (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5204

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

Hospitality is a virtue praised in the Rig Veda (10-117) and the  Sangam Tamil Literature. A Tamil verse in Purananuru ( verse 182) says that even if it is the ambrosia from Indra Loka, Tamils wouldn’t eat it alone, without sharing. From the oldest book in the world Rig Veda to the latest film songs, Hindus praise this virtue as an act which gives one religious merit (Punya). Tirukkural, the Tamil Veda has lot of verses on it. There are thousands of Choultries (Chatras) which have been giving free food for guests from the Vedic Days.

In Bhagavad Gita (3-13), Lord Krishna says that one who cooks for himself alone is a sinner.

There is a story in Tamil Periya Purana to illustrate this point:

Periapuranam written by Sekkizar , is a great Tamil literary master piece which gives the life stories of 63 Siva Devotees of Tamil Nadu in verses. Like Shakespeare had portrayed human nature in all its diverse subtle aspects in his dramas, Sekkizar  has given us  unrivalled picture of the myriad sided character of the human mind in the world of religious and mystic life. The only difference is that Shakespeare used the medium of drama for unfolding his ideas, while poet Sekkizar has chosen the narrative form of literature. We have about 4000 verses in the Periya Puranam. Sekkizar lived 500 years before Shakespeare.

Here is the story highlighting the virtue of hospitality:-

Ilayankudi was a small village in Tamil Nadu. There lived a farmer by name Maran. He was so philanthropic that he donated all his wealth or life earnings to the devotees of Lord Siva.

According to Periya puranam, Lord Siva wanted to show the world that Mara Nayanar was imbued with true love and service towards his devotees.

One day ,during the rainy season, a Siva devotee knocked at the door of Mara Nayanar at the dead of night. Nayanar received him with a smile in his face and asked him to wait in the front room. When he asked his wife to cook something for him, she told him that there was no rice in the house.  She remembered however one thing; they sowed the paddy that day in their land, and if they could be collected, she could prepare some food.

As he heard his wife’s words, he felt glad as though he had recovered a lost treasure. He started at once to bring the paddy seeds. It was pouring down and there was pitch darkness. Impelled by love and spirit of hospitality, he took a basket, covered his head and collected as much paddy as he could from the muddy field. The seeds were floating the rain water. His wife prepared food after cleaning them. She asked him to collect the greens (spinach) from the backyard and prepared different dishes with the same greens.

When the food war ready, hot and steaming, Maran went to the front of the house to invite his guest for dinner. But the guest suddenly disappeared and in place rose a Brilliance and the couple saw the Divine Presence of Lod Siva and Parvati.

 

This story illustrates two things: the respect shown to Siva’s devotees and the hospitality.

We have a beautiful hymn Rig Veda (10-117) about this virtue:

 

Guests in the Rig Veda (10-117)

 

The Devas have not given hunger to be our death,

even to the well-fed man death comes in many shapes

The wealth of the liberal never wastes away,

he who gives no protection finds no consoler.(1)

 

He who, possessed of food, hardens his heart against

the weak man, craving nourishment, and suffering,

who comes to him for help, though of old he helped him

surely such a one finds no consoler.(2)

 

He is liberal who gives to one who asks for alms

to the distressed man who seeks food, wandering; success comes to him in the challenge of battle

and for future conflicts he makes a friend for him. (3)

 

He is no friend who does not give to a friend

to a comrade who comes imploring for food;

let him leave such a man – his is not a home—

and rather seek a stranger who brings him comfort. (4)

 

Let the rich man satisfy one who seeks help

and let him look upon a longer pathway;

wealth revolves like the wheels of a chariot,

coming now to one, now to another. (5)

 

–Subham–

 

 

SANSKRIT WAS SPOKEN BY ALL! (Post No.5201)

 

Compiled by London swaminathan

 

Date: 9 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London – 20-49  (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5201

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

There is a good article written by S P Caturvedi of Nagpur in the Woolmer Commemoration Volume published in 1940. I am attaching the pages for verbatim report.

Following are the interesting points in the article:

1.Sanskrit was a Spoken language; even Sudras spoke Sanskrit.

2.Age of Panini is closer to Mahabharata; he lived before ninth century BCE.

3.Panini lists 2000 roots; but only 900 were used in Classical Sanskrit.

4.There is a big time gap between Panini and Patanjali.

  1. Panini did not use the word Samskrtam for the language.

6.Panini’s vocabulary was ancient.

  1. The vocabulary of Ashtadyayee was vast and rich; almost all conceivable topics in the world are covered.
  2. There is no force in the argument that Sanskrit was refined or adorned by Panini. Grammarians don’t create languages. They only write grammar for the existing language.

The article is very crisp and interesting: –

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

–Subham–

STINGY AMERICANS (Post No.5195)

Economy & Endurance Anecdotes (Post No.5195)


Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 8 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London –  9-17 am (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5195

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

STINGY ROOSVELT


Shortly before sailing back to England foreign correspondent Quentin Reynolds was received by President Roosevelt in his office at the White House. While he was there the President put through a transatlantic call to another eminent statesman, Winston Churchill.
Mr Reynolds was slightly startled when, after a conversation, the President said
‘I will have to hang up now. My three minutes are up’.

Xxx

STINGY COOLIDGE

A visitor to the Whitehouse during the Coolidge administration said to the President that that he would greatly appreciate the gift of a cigar, not for himself but for a friend who had the eccentricity of collecting cigar bands from famous smokers all over the world .

President Coolidge thought the matter-over for a few seconds, then reached for a box of cigars.
Taking one out he carefully removed the band , replaced the cigar in the box , and handed the band to his visitor .

Xxx

BIG MONEY MAKES YOU STINGY!


At Lobbs, the famous English bootmaker, one day, I saw on the floor a heap of twenty or thirty boots , all needing cobbling badly.
Oh sir, Lobbs explained , these Belong to the best customer I ever had . He used to come in here and order15 or 20 pairs of boots ,
But when his father died he left him some three million dollars.

“Well, sir, since then he has not ordered a single pair of New boots but sends the old ones to be repaired”.
Who is he, Lobbs, I asked.
An American, sir…… his name is Pierpont Morgan
Xxxxx

 
Endurance anecdotes
In the days of the homestead law a prospective settler sought out a lawyer friend and asked him to explain the law and its operations.

I don’t know the exact text of the law, said his friend, but I can give you the draft of it. The government is willing to bet you 160 acres of land against 14 dollar that you can’t live on it five years without starving to death

 

XXX

BUYER SENT HOME!

Much more eccentricity anecdotes

Alfred Stieglitz has always been a highly arbitrary and erratic dealer in paintings . Once, at a show of the work of Georgia O Keefe, a wealthy woman expressed, with a slightly patronising attitude, a desire to purchase a certain picture . Repelled subtly by the woman’s manner Stieglitz snapped,
“Why do you want that painting? Give me some reason why you want it”
The prospective purchaser could think of no satisfactory reason and was refused the picture.

Xxx

 

‘Don’t you know who I am?’

A traffic cop will signal Pop Gershwin to stop. Pop has been exceeding the speed limit, perhaps in the u unconscious belief that the father of the jazz king has rights that even the police force must respect.
Don’t you know who I am? He asks the officer
I am the father of George Gershwin
At the same time, being a New Yorker, he pronounces the first name to rhyme with judge
(The Jewish American pronunciations of George and judge are surprisingly similar)

The officer scratches his head. He doesn’t know every judge in Gotham. Perhaps this judge Gershwin is a big run up in the Bronx. Better to be safe than sorry.

A salute and he  lets Pa Gershwin pass.
Who now can tell Pa that Gershwin isn’t the king?
Xxxx SUBHAM XXX

 

 

Interesting Stories from Mithila, Sita’s Birth Place (Post No.5190)

Sita Mandir, Janakpur, Nepal.

COMPILED  by London swaminathan

 

Date: 7 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London –   7-17 am  (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5190

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

There are many interesting stories about the City of Mithilaa.
The most famous story is from the Upanishad about the philosopher king Janaka discussing the meaning of the Veda when Mithila was on fire.
Janaka was not only a great king and a great sacrificer but also a great patron of culture and philosophy. His court was adorned with learned Brahmanas from Kosala and Kuru Panchala regions. Some of them are named , Asvala, Jaratkarva, Artabhaga Miss Garki Vacaknavi, Uddalaka Aruni, Vidagdha Sakalya and Kahoda Kausitakeya A Brahmin named Brahmayu who was well versed in history, grammar and worldly wisdom lived in Mithilaa.

In the Mahabharata,12-17, there is a saying attributed to Janaka of Mithilaa. Seeing his city burning in a fire the king of Mithilaa sang thus
“In this world, nothing of mine is burning
Mithilaayaam pradtaayaam na me dahyati kincana”

xxx

But there are other stories not that popular.
Mithilaa was the capital of the kingdom of Videha also called Tirabhkti, modern Tirhut.

Mithila has been identified with the modern Janakapura, a small town within the Nepal border.

During the reign of Janaka, it took Visvamitra together with Rama and Lakshmana four days to reach Mithilaa from Ayodhyaa to. On the way they rested for one night at Visala (Valmiki Ramayana)

(My comments: the road distance today is 450 kms. They must have travelled by a short cut route and they could have walked at least 50 miles a day or by horse ride it is quicker)
According to Satapata Brahmana, Videha was so named after Madhava, the Videha who colonised it. Videha was famous for handsome people and horses of noble breed
xx

 

Narendra Modi in Janakpur, Nepal.
Mahabharata on Mithilaa
Bhima and Arjuna visited it with Krishna on his way from Indraprastha to Rajagriha.

Mahabharata points out that Karna conquered  Mithilaa during his digvijaya.

 

xxx
Jain literature on Mithilaa
Mahavira 24th Tirthankara of Jainism Mahavira was born in Videha and he lived there for thirty years. He was called Videha and his mother was called Videhadattaa.

xxx

Story of Nimi
Vasisthta having performed a fire sacrifice of Indra proceeded to Mithilaa to commence a sacrifice for King Nimi. On reaching there he came to know that the king had engaged Gautama to perform the sacrificial rites. Seeing the king asleep he cursed him thus king Nimi will be bodiless. (Videha =vigata Deha) because he rejected me. The king on awakening cursed Vasistha saying that he too would perish as he cursed a sleeping king.
The sages churned the body of Nimi and as a result of the churning a child was born, afterwards known as Mithi. After Mithi, Mithilaa was named and the kings were called Maithilas.
This is in Vishnu Purana
Xxx


Jataka stories
MIthila had at each of it’s four gates a market town. They formed for suburban towns. Videha contained 16000 villages 16000 store houses and 16000 dancing girls.

 

A disciple of the Buddha who was an inhabitant of Sravasti took cart loads of articles and went to Videha for trade. There he sold his articles and filled the carts with articles got in exchange.

King Videha had four sages to instruct him in law. The son of this king was educated at Taxila. A young named Pinguttara living in Mithilaa went to  Taxasiila and studied under a famous teacher. He soon completed his education. Then after diligent study he proposed to take leave of his teacher and go back home. But in the teacher’s family there was a custom if there be any daughter ripe for marriage, she should be given to the eldest pupil. So the teacher said,
I shall give you my daughter and you shall take her with you. He went home as a married man.
Xxx

Sumedha and Buddha


Sumedha, a childless widow of Suruchi, king of Mithilaa prayed for a son. She took the eight fold vow (Ashtasiilaani), and sat meditating upon the virtues. Sakka  in the guise of a sage came to fulfil her desire. He was entreated by her to grant her the boon of a son. She was asked by him to sing her own praises in fifteen stanzas, which she did to his satisfaction. Afterwards she was blessed with a child.

Xxx
Videha was ruled by Cedaga, Mahavira’s maternal uncle. He was an influential leader of Lichchavi confederacy. His daughter Cellanaa or Vaidehi was married to Srenika Bimbisara of Magadha and became the father of Kunika Ajatasatru

XX x

Vedas mentioned a king named Namiisaapya
Xxx
600000 pieces a day!
King Saadhina of Mithilaa lived in happiness for many years. He ruled this city righteously. Six alms halls were built by him. Daily sixth thousand pieces were spent in alms.
Xxx
Bodhi sattvaavadana kala of Kshemendra refers to Mithilaa ruled by Pusphadeva who had two pious sons named Chandra and Surya. The munificent king Vijitavi of Mithilaa was banished from his kingdom. He took shelter in a leaf hut near the Himalayas. Mithilaa was governed by the descendants of a Nagadeva, Sagaradeva, and Mahadeva
Xxx
3000 Kings of India!!!

Sita Stamp.

Some time back I started posting the names of 3000 Kings of India. After 1500 plus, kings I got one here and one there. So I stopped posting them Here in  Mithilaa, we come across following new names:

Mostly from Jataka stories

Mahajanaka,

King Saadhina,
Namisaapya, Vedic index I, 436
Pushpadeva,
Vijitaavi
Cedaga, jain sources
King Angati,
Mithi
King Mahadeva (Madhva)
King Pabhata
King Suruci

Nagadeva
Sagaradeva

(other kings are already covered in the Purana list of Kings)
Xxx
Polygamy
Brahmadatta, king of Benares, had a daughter named Sumedha whom he declined to give in marriage to a Videha king who had large number of wives, fearing that her cowives wold make herself life miserable. Polygamy appears to have been in vogue among some Videha kings.

 

Source- India Antiqua, Leyden, 1947

Xxx SUBHAM xxx

RARE PAINTINGS AND RARE SCULPTURES (Post No.5188)

COMPILED  by London swaminathan

 

Date: 6 JULY 2018

 

Time uploaded in London –   13-58

 (British Summer Time)

 

Post No. 5188

 

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources such as Facebook friends, Wikipedia, Books, Google and newspapers; thanks. Pictures may be subject to copyright laws.

 

 

A KRISHNA WITH A LION AND ELEPHANT IN TWO HANDS IN THAILAND PRASART MUSEUM. PALLAVA PAITINGS OF SITHTHANNAVASAL (TAMIL NADU) ARE IN 1926 BOOK. KRISHNA’S ADVENTURE OF LIFTING GOVARDHANA HILL IS IN GUJARAT. SOME RARE PIECES FROM VERY OLD BOOK ARE GIVEN BELOW:

 

MAHADEVA- PALLAVA PERIOD

GANDHARVA

APSARA

MUSIC PARTY- BAGH FRESCO

KRISHNA LIFTING GOVARDHANA HILL

RAMA’S DEPARTURE FROM AYODHYA

DAANA LILA

 

WOMAN IN THE KITCHEN

INDRA AND MAHA KALA (BHAIRAVA)

KRISHNA LIFTING A LION AND AN ELEPHANT

–SUBHAM–