MARK TWAIN’S FAMOUS LECTURE! (Post No.5669)

Compiled by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 16 November 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London –20-56
Post No. 5669

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

After a great deal of urging, Mark Twain’s friends in San Francesco persuaded him to give a lecture on the interesting things he had seen in the Hawaiian Islands during his visit in the fall of 1866. In order to encourage the new lecturer, they promised to place hearty laughers at strategic points among the audience.

Tell them not to investigate my jokes, but to respond at once, Clemens (Mark Twain) said.
When he came out on the platform his knees were so violently that his backers thought that he would not last long enough for the hearty laughers to get into action. But Clemens needed no support, for he won the day by his inimitable opening,
Julius Caesar is dead,
Shakespeare is dead
Napoleon is dead
Abraham Lincoln is dead
And I am far from well myself

When the lecture was over, the audience had been laughing much they were too weak to leave their seats.

Xxxx


Mark Twain in his lecturing days , reached a small Eastern town one afternoon and went before dinner to a barbers to be shaved.
You are a stranger in town, sir? The barber asked.
Yes, I am a stranger here, was the reply.
We are having a good lecture here tonight, sir, said the barber, a Mark Twain lecture. Are you going to it?

Yes, I think I will, said Clemens.
Have you got your ticket yet? The barber asked.
No, not yet, said the other.
Then, sir, you will have to stand.
Dear me, Mr Clemens exclaimed, it seems as if I always do have to stand when I hear that man Twain lecture.

XXXXX

 

Mark Twain profile
American Children’s Writer
Born Nov.30, 1835
Died Apr. 21, 1910
Age at Death 74

Mark Twain is one of America’s great humorous writers. He created two famous characters— Tom Sawyer and Hhuckleberry Finn .
Twain was born Samuel Leghorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri, the fifth of six children. His father suffered ill health, and the family was poor . In 1839 they moved to Hannibal, a rapidly growing town on the Mississippi River, where Twain went to the local school. When he was 12, his father died and Twain had to leave school to find work.

At age 22 Twain became a river pilot at a time when there were 1000 boats a day on the Mississippi. He followed this trade for four years and loved it, but river traffic ended during the American civil war.
Becoming a full time reporter in 1862, he soon began to use the pen name Mark Twain. He published his first important story at age 32 and his first successful novel, the humorous travel book The Innocents Abroad, when he was 34.

In 1870 Twain married Olivia Langdon, with whom he had five children. He wrote his classic children s stories The Ad,,,, and the adv,,,in his 40s. Twain had become increasingly disillusioned by modern life and personal tragedies, and the book s provided an opportunity for him to relieve the golden days of his boyhood on the Mississippi. Both stories give a realistic picture of life around the Mississippi and are full of adventure and humour. The ad h f , ,, considered his master piece, is noted for its accurate and sympathetic depiction of adolescent life.

Publications

1867 The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and Other Sketches
1869 The Innocents Abroad
1872 Roughing It
1876 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
1881 The Prince and The Pauper
1884 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
1894 Pudd’n head Wilson A Tale

TAGS- Mark Twain Profile, Mark Twain’s lecture
Xxxx

MICHELANGELO AND THE CRITIC (Post No.5662)

Compiled by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 14 November 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London –10-57 am
Post No. 5662

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

 

A shallow poet took Piron (FRENCH DRAMATIST)  into his confidence and entrusted him a long manuscript, assuring the critic that the verses contained therein were the best he had ever written . With an air condescension, he asked Piron to put a cross before each line which he thought might possibly be improved. When he asked for his manuscript a few days later Piron handed it to him without a word. Leafing hastily through it, the author exclaimed delightedly,
Why I don’t see a single cross on my paper.
No, returned Piron dryly,
I didn’t want to make a graveyard of it.

Xxx

 

MICHELANGELO AND CRITIC


When Michelangelo had completed his great sculptural work, the David, Gonfalonier Soderini of Florence who had ordered it came to inspect his purchase. Among his other criticisms he objected to the nose, pronouncing it to be out of all proportion to the rest of the figure, and added, that he wished some reduction should take place in its size. Angelo knew well with whom he had to deal; he mounted the scaffold for the figure upwards of twelve feet high, and giving a few sonorous but harmless blows with his hammer on the stone, let fall a handful of marble dust which he had scrapped up from the floor below; and then descending from his station turned to the Gonfalonier with a look expectant of his approbation. At, exclaimed the sagacious critic; now you have given it life indeed.

Michelangelo was content, and receiving his four hundred scrudi for his tasks, wisely said no more . It would have been no gratification to a man like him, to have shown the incapacity of a presumptuous critic like Soderini.

Xxx

DRAMA-TIC CRITICISM

Professor Brander Mathews was a great stickler for proprieties. At an opening night he had gone to review a play. The next day he was asked for his opinion by one of his students at Colombia university.
Well, gentlemen, said Professor Mathews, the play was in four acts, and I was there as the guest of the author.
After the first act the audience sat silent and I applauded. After the second act I sat quiet while the audience hissed.

The professor took a long drawn and reminiscent pull at his cigarette, then held it at arm’s length and flicked off the ashes.
And the third act?
Well gentlemen, and there was a gleam of satisfaction in the Professor s eye, after the third act I went out and bought standing room and came back and hissed too.

Xxxx Subham xxx

 

A B C D POEM REVIEW –1 2 3 4 ! (Post No.5660)

 

Compiled by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 13 November 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London –11-51 am
Post No. 5660

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

CRITICS ANECDOTES

According to Richard Aldington, in the early days of Dada (predecessor of surrealism) I received for review a book which contained the following poem
A B C D E F
G H I J K L
M N O P Q R
S T U V W X
Y Z

on which I commented,

1 2345
678910

I still think that was the most snappy review I ever wrote; but unfortunately The Times refused to print it.
Xxx

WHO WILL MAKE A NAME?

Richard Aldington tells that,
An American friend of mine was then editing the Outlook, and asked me to write an article telling his readers about young writers and picking out those I thought would make a name. I made a choice which I modestly think wasn’t bad for 1919 :
James Joyce, T S Eliot, d h Lawrence, Aldous Huxley, and marcel Proust. I received a letter from the editor in these terms,
For God’s sake, Richard, can’t you think of somebody who has been heard of or is ever likely to be heard of?
I protested, and my article was submitted to the judgement of that eminent expatriate, Mr Logan Pearsall Smith, who decided that my writers never would be heard of; and the article was rejected. If I had chosen such mediocrities as Jack Squire, Hugh Walpole, Frank Swinner town, I should have received a cheque and a crown of wide parsley.

Xxx

BURY THE CRITIC
A man said he was afraid he was going to be of no use in the world because he had only one talent.
Oh that need not discourage you, said his pastor. What is your talent?
The talent of criticism.
Well, I advise you, said his pastor, to do with it what the man of one talent in the parable did with his. Criticism may be useful when mixed with other talents, but those whose only activity is to criticise the workers might as well be buried, talent and all.

Xxx

 

BEATING A BIG DRUM

Jerrold admired Carlyle, but objected that he did not give definite suggestions for the improvement of the age which he rebuked.
Here, said he, is a man who beats a big drum under my windows, and when I come running down stairs, has nowhere for me to go.

Xxx

DR JOHNSON ON CRITICISM

A friend of Dr Johnson s, in conversation with him, was lamenting the disagreeable situation in which those persons stood who were eminent for their criticisms. As they were perpetually expected to be saying clever things, it was a heavy tax on them.
It is indeed, said Dr Johnson, a very heavy tax on them; a tax which no man can pay who does not steal.

XXXX SUBHAM XXXX

KING IS GOD – MANU AND VALLUVAR AGREE (Post No.5651)

Written  by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 11 November 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London –14-04
Post No. 5651

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

The king who protects his people rendering justice,

according to the laws of the land

Will be hailed as the Divine Lord, by his subjects.

–Tirukkuraal 388

WE CONTINUE FROM SLOKA 57 OF FIFTH CHAPTER OF MANU SMRTI

In this section, MANU discusses the impure period that follows birth or death of near and dear. He also discusses ruler of the land.

MY COMMENTS

The amazing thing about this section is Hindus follow the same beliefs from Kashmir to Kanyakumari.

1.Though Egypt and other cultures considered King as God, the amazing thing about Hindus is Sanskrit and Tamil have the same words for God and King. Same word for God and King. And the second amazing thing is he is compared with the Vedic gods in Sangam literature and Manu. Tiruvalluvar, author of Tamil Veda Tirukkura,l called King as God like Manu. The Tamil word Irai and Ko stand for God and King. Tamil word Koil stands for Hindu Temple and Hindu Palace.

2.This section explodes the Aryan Migration theory and Dravidian and Aryan division theory. From birth to death water and bathing are used to remove impurity. So the Hindus belong to tropical region. They did not come from temperate regions.

No other culture in the world uses water for such rituals. This shows that Hindus did not come from outside and they are the sons of the soil.

3.Only Hindus considered Teacher as God. Manu deals with impure period after teacher’s death. This is not found in any other culture. So Hindus are sons of the soil; never came from outside. When they migrated to other countries they took some of the customs.

4.No other culture in the world the rules for impure period. This shows they have evolved all such rules in this country. Since Manu’s name is in the Rig Veda and he talks about flowing Sarasvati river and he never spoken about Sati, he must have lived in the Vedic period.

5.Slokas 105 to 110 are beautiful quotations on Purity

6.His directions about the directions for dead bodies and suicide are interesting.

7.The concept of Seven Generations is repeated in Tamil and Sanskritliterature hundredsof times. The absence of this Seven Generations in other cultures show thatHindus are sons of the soil and Aryan immigration is concocted by vested interests. Since Tamils also repeat Seven Generations, they had the same belief.

 

KING IS GOD


  1. A king is an incarnation of the eight guardian deities of the world, the Moon, the Fire, the Sun, the Wind, Indra, the Lords of wealth and water (Kubera and Varuna), and Yama.
  2. Because the king is pervaded by those lords of the world, no impurity is ordained for him; for purity and impurity of mortals is caused and removed by (those) lords of the world.
  3. By him who is slain in battle with brandished weapons according to the law of the Kshatriyas, a (Srauta) sacrifice is instantly completed, and so is the period of impurity (caused by his death); that is a settled rule.
  4. (At the end of the period of impurity) a Brahmana who has performed the necessary rites, becomes pure by touching water, a Kshatriya by touching the animal on which he rides, and his weapons, a Vaisya by touching his goad or the nose-string (of his oxen), a Sudra by touching his staff.

  5. Thus the purification (required) on (the death of) Sapindas has been explained to you, O best of twice-born men; hear now the manner in which men are purified on the death of any (relative who is) not a Sapinda.
  6. A Brahmana, having carried out a dead Brahmana who is not a Sapinda, as (if he were) a (near) relative, or a near relative of his mother, becomes pure after three days;
  7. But if he eats the food of the (Sapindas of the deceased), he is purified in ten days, (but) in one day, if he does not eat their food nor dwells in their house.
  8. Having voluntarily followed a corpse, whether (that of) a paternal kinsman or (of) a stranger, he becomes pure by bathing, dressed in his clothes, by touching fire and eating clarified butter.
  9. Let him not allow a dead Brahmana to be carried out by a Sudra, while men of the same caste are at hand; for that burnt-offering which is defiled by a Sudra’s touch is detrimental to (the deceased’s passage to) heaven.

SOURCE OF PURITY


  1. The knowledge of Brahman austerities, fire, holy food, earth, restraint of the internal organ, water, smearing with cow dung, the wind, sacred rites, the sun, and time are the purifiers of corporeal beings.

  2. Among all modes of purification, purity in the acquisition of wealth is declared to be the best; for he is pure who gains wealth with clean hands, not he who purifies himself with earth and water.

  3. The learned are purified by a forgiving disposition, those who have committed forbidden actions by liberality, secret sinners by muttering sacred texts, and those who best know the Veda by austerities.

  4. By earth and water is purified what ought to be made pure,

 a river by its current,

a woman whose thoughts have been impure by the menstrual secretion,

a Brahmana by abandoning the world (samnyasa).

  1. The body is cleansed by water,

the internal organ is purified by truthfulness,

the individual soul by sacred learning and austerities,

the intellect by (true) knowledge.


  1. Thus the precise rules for the purification of the body have been declared to you; hear now the decision (of the law) regarding the purification of the various (inanimate) things.


BACK TO SLOKA 57





Impure Periods


  1. I will now in due order explain the purification for the dead and the purification of things as they are prescribed for the four castes (varna).
  2. When (a child) dies that has teethed, or that before teething has received (the sacrament of) the tonsure (Kudakarana) or (of the initiation), all relatives (become) impure, and on the birth (of a child) the same (rule) is prescribed.
  3. It is ordained (that) among Sapindas the impurity on account of a death (shall last) ten days, (or) until the bones have been collected, (or) three days or one day only.

Co feeding relatives are Sapindas.

SEVEN GENERATIONS


  1. But the Sapinda-relationship ceases with the seventh person in the ascending and descending lines, the Samanodaka-relationship when the (common) origin and the (existence of a common family)-name are no (longer) known.
  2. As this impurity on account of a death is prescribed for (all) Sapindas, even so it shall be (held) on a birth by those who desire to be absolutely pure.
  3. Or while the impurity on account of a death is common to all (Sapindas), that caused by a birth falls on the parents alone; (or) it shall fall on the mother alone, and the father shall become pure by bathing;
  4. But a man, having spent his strength, is purified merely by bathing; after begetting a child (on a remarried female), he shall retain the impurity during three days.
  5. Those who have touched a corpse are purified after one day and night (added to) three periods of three days; those who give libations of water, after three days.

Ritual for Deceased Teacher


  1. A pupil who performs the Pitrimedha for his deceased teacher, becomes also pure after ten days, just like those who carry the corpse out (to the burial-ground).
  2. (A woman) is purified on a miscarriage in as many (days and) nights as months (elapsed after conception), and a menstruating female becomes pure by bathing after the menstrual secretion has ceased (to flow).
  3. (On the death) of children whose tonsure (Kudakarman) has not been performed, the (Sapindas) are declared to become pure in one (day and) night; (on the death) of those who have received the tonsure (but not the initiation, the law) ordains (that) the purification (takes place) after three days.
  4. A child that has died before the completion of its second year, the relatives shall carry out (of the village), decked (with flowers, and bury it) in pure ground, without collecting the bones (afterwards).

Rules for Child


  1. Such a child shall not be burnt with fire, and no libations of water shall be offered to it; leaving it like a (log of) wood in the forest, (the relatives) shall remain impure during three days only.
  2. The relatives shall not offer libations to (a child) that has not reached the third year; but if it had teeth, or the ceremony of naming it (Namakarman) had been performed, (the offering of water is) optional.
  3. If a fellow-student has died, the Smriti prescribes an impurity of one day; on a birth the purification of the Samanodakas is declared (to take place) after three (days and) nights.
  4. (On the death) of females (betrothed but) not married (the bridegroom and his) relatives are purified after three days, and the paternal relatives become pure according to the same rule.
  5. Let mourners eat food without factitious salt, bathe during three days, abstain from meat, and sleep separate on the ground.
  6. The above rule regarding impurity on account of a death has been prescribed (for cases where the kinsmen live) near (the deceased); (Sapinda) kinsmen and (Samanodaka) relatives must know the following rule (to refer to cases where deceased lived) at a distance (from them).
  7. He who may hear that (a relative) residing in a distant country has died, before ten (days after his death have elapsed), shall be impure for the remainder of the period of ten (days and) nights only.
  8. If the ten days have passed, he shall be impure during three (days and) nights; but if a year has elapsed (since the occurrence of the death), he becomes pure merely by bathing.
  9. A man who hears of a (Sapinda) relative’s death, or of the birth of a son after the ten days (of impurity have passed), becomes pure by bathing, dressed in his garments.
  10. If an infant (that has not teethed), or a (grownup relative who is) not a Sapinda, die in a distant country, one becomes at once pure after bathing in one’s clothes.
  11. If within the ten days (of impurity) another birth or death happens, a Brahmana shall remain impure only until the (first) period of ten days has expired.

DEATH OF TEACHER


  1. They declare that, when the teacher (acarya) has died, the impurity (lasts) three days; if the (teacher’s) son or wife (is dead, it lasts) a day and a night; that is a settled (rule).
  2. For a Srotriya who resides with (him out of affection), a man shall be impure for three days; for a maternal uncle, a pupil, an officiating priest, or a maternal relative, for one night together with the preceding and following days.
  3. If the king in whose realm he resides is dead, (he shall be impure) as long as the light (of the sun or stars shines), but for (an intimate friend) who is not a Srotriya (the impurity lasts) for a whole day, likewise for a Guru who knows the Veda and the Angas.
  4. A Brahmana shall be pure after ten days, a Kshatriya after twelve, a Vaisya after fifteen, and a Sudra is purified after a month.
  5. Let him not (unnecessarily) lengthen the period of impurity, nor interrupt the rites to be performed with the sacred fires; for he who performs that (Agnihotra) rite will not be impure, though (he be) a (Sapinda) relative.
  6. When he has touched a Candala, a menstruating woman, an outcast, a woman in childbed, a corpse, or one who has touched a (corpse), he becomes pure by bathing.
  7. He who has purified himself by sipping water shall, on seeing any impure (thing or person), always mutter the sacred texts, addressed to Surya, and the Pavamani verses.
  8. A Brahmana who has touched a human bone to which fat adheres, becomes pure by bathing; if it be free from fat, by sipping water and by touching (afterwards) a cow or looking at the sun.
  9. He who has undertaken the performance of a vow shall not pour out libations (to the dead) until the vow has been completed; but when he has offered water after its completion, he becomes pure in three days only.

SUICIDE


  1. Libations of water shall not be offered to those who (neglect the prescribed rites and may be said to) have been born in vain, to those born in consequence of an illegal mixture of the castes, to those who are ascetics (of heretical sects), and to those who have committed suicide,
  2. To women who have joined a heretical sect, who through lust live (with many men), who have caused an abortion, have killed their husbands, or drink spirituous liquor.

DIRECTION FOR DEAD BODIES


  1. A student does not break his vow by carrying out (to the place of cremation) his own dead teacher (akarya), sub-teacher (upadhyaya), father, mother, or Guru.
  2. Let him carry out a dead Sudra by the southern gate of the town, but (the corpses of) twice-born men, as is proper, by the western, northern, or eastern (gates).
  3. The taint of impurity does not fall on kings, and those engaged in the performance of a vow, or of a Sattra; for the (first are) seated on the throne of Indra, and the (last two are) ever pure like Brahman.
  4. For a king, on the throne of magnanimity, immediate purification is prescribed, and the reason for that is that he is seated (there) for the protection of (his) subjects.

WAR DEATHS

  1. (The same rule applies to the kinsmen) of those who have fallen in a riot or a battle, (of those who have been killed) by lightning or by the king, and (of those who perished fighting) for cows and Brahmanas, and to those whom the king wishes (to be pure).

—to be continued……………………

tags- Impure Periods, Birth and death, King and God, Purity Quotes

–subham–

Why does Rahu devour Sun and Moon? (Post No.5648)

Written  by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 10 November 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London –13-16
Post No. 5648

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

We continue with Niti Sataka of Bhartruhari. Let us look at slokas/couplets 28,29,30

Bhartruhari stresses in thse three slokas that one must do commendable things.  The animals and humans are in different groupings because of their difference in actions. If a man goes higher and obtain fame , that will differentiate him from ordinary people and animals.

These slokas are about Fame

परिवर्तिनि संसारे
मृतः को वा न जायते ।
स जातो येन जातेन
याति वंशः समुन्नतिम् ॥ 1.29 ॥

What man is not born again while he passes from one birth to another? But that man is only truly born by whose birth his family attains to dignity.

Bhartruhari says one attains fame by improving the prosperity and dignity of the family.

Tamil poet Thiruvalluvar, author of Tamil Veda Tirukkural, says,

If one takes birth in this world one should come with qualities which bring fame; if it is not it is better not to appear al all- Kural 236

He adds,

The gods will honour those who have earned everlasting fame rather than the sages who have attained the abode of the gods – Kural 234

xxx

 

कुसुमस्तवकस्येव
द्वयी वृत्तिर्मनस्विनः ।
मूर्ध्नि वा सर्वलोकस्य
शीर्यते वन एव वा ॥ 1.30 ॥

There are two uses both for a flower bunch (inflorescence) and also for a wise man; they may be exalted on the head or wither in the forest.

Lord Krishna in Bhagavad Gita says

Uththishta , Yaso labha!

Arise! Attain Fame

— Bhagavad Gita 11-33

In Tamil and Sanskrit there are sayigs about men

‘Like a lamp inside a pot’ (may be compared to forest flower)

‘Like a lamp at the top of a hill’ (may be compared to flower on the head of a beautiful woman)

Some wither like beautiful flowers in the forest, without anyone knowing about it.

Others are praised like the flower bunch on the head of a beauty.

xxx

Rahu devouring Moon

‘Although there are plantes like Brihaspati who is the head of the devas, yet Rahu with great mighty power never attack Brihaspati and others. He devours Sun (Lord of the Day) and Moon (Ruler  of the Night) during the periods of eclipse’.

सन्त्यन्ये‌உपि बृहस्पतिप्रभृतयः सम्भाविताः पञ्चषास्

तान्प्रत्येष विशेषविक्रमरुची राहुर्न वैरायते ।
द्वावेव ग्रसते दिवाकरनिशाप्राणेश्वरौ भास्करौ
भ्रातः पर्वणि पश्य दानवपतिः शीर्षावशेषाकृतिः ॥ 1.31 ॥

Here Bhartruhari insists one must do great things; difficult it may be but that which brings glory. That is why Rahu, the snake, goes to Sun and Moon leaving other bright objects in the sky such as Jupiter (Brihaspati) or Venus (Sukra).

No use of fighting with a weakling; no use of beating a dead snake; if one needs fame one must take big tasks.

Hindus who calculated the exact time of eclipses thousands of years ago, used to explain the eclipses to lay men as snakes devouring the sun and the moon.  During the eclipse the sun or moon looks like a round ball devored by someone and released back slowly. Rahu’s head was cut off by Lord Vishnu when he tried to steal the Elixir Amruta according to Hindu Mythology.

–subham–

MEN OF WIT ARE NOT FIT FOR JOBS (Post No.5643)

Compiled by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 9 November 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London –7-27 am
Post No. 5643

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

Learned Men Anecdotes

Someone once rudely taunted John Maynard, Lord Commissioner of the Great Seal of England, with having grown so old as to forget his law.
“True Sir”, he replied,
“I have forgotten more law than you ever learned” .

Xxxx

PHILOSOPHERS ALSO NEED FOOD

A noble man observing a person eminent for his philosophical talents, intent on choosing delicacies at table said to him,
What! Do you philosophers love dainties?
Why not — do you think my Lord, that the good things of the world were only made for blockheads?

Xxx

 

MEN OF WIT ARE NOT FIT FOR JOBS
The Duke of Newcastle, when prime minister, once told the author of Tristan Shandy, that men of wit were not fit to be employed, being incapable of business.

“They are not incapable of business, my Lord, but above it, replied Sterne. A sprightly generous horse is able to carry a pack saddle as well as an ass, but he is too good to be put to the drudgery”.

Xxxx

 

WORDS WORTH AND COLERIDGE COULD NOT DO IT

Cottle, the Bath bookseller, recorded,

I removed the harness…..but…… could not get off the collar. In despair I called for assistance. Mr Wordsworth first brought his ingenuity into exercise, but, after several unsuccessful efforts, he relinquished the achievement as altogether impracticable. Mr Coleridge now tried his hand, but….after twisting the poor horse’s neck, almost to strangulation, and the great danger of his eyes, he gave up the useless task, pronouncing that the horse head must have grown (gout or dropsy) since the collar was put on! for it was a downright impossibility for such a huge os frontis to pass through narrow a collar! At about this juncture the servant girl appeared, turned the collar upside down, and removed it.

Xxx


PLATO HAS MY IDEAS!
One of Emerson’s rural neighbor s at Concord borrowed from him a copy of Plato
Did you enjoy the book?, asked Emerson, when it was returned.
I did that, replied his neighbour.
This Plato has a lot of my ideas

Xxx

QUEEN CHRISTINA
Queen Christina of Sweden complimented the celebrated Vossius by saying that he was so well learned as not only to know whence all the words came but whither they were going.

Tags: Plato, Men of wit, Coleridge, law, philosophers

XXX  SUBHAM XXX

FOOLS LIKE FOOLS; SCHOLARS LIKE SCHOLARS (Post 5627)

Compiled by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 5 November 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London – 6-43 am

Post No. 5627

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

‘Similia Similibus Curantur’ ( ‘like cures like’-Homeopathy Principle)

When Dante was at the court of Signor Della Scala , then sovereign of Verona, that prince said to him one day.
“I wonder Signor Dante ,that a man so learned as you should be hated by all my court, and this fool should be so beloved.”

Highly piqued Dante replied,
“Your Excellency would wonder less if you considered that we like those best who most resemble ourselves.”

xxx

Dante profile

Italian Poet

Born June 1265
Died September 1321
Age at death 56

Publications

1292-94 The New Life
1309-1321 The Divine Comedy

Dante is one of the most important writers in the history of the world literature. He is Italy’s most celebrated poet, and his master piece The Divine Comedy is the greatest Italian poem

Dante Alighieri was born in the Italian city of Florence. At the age of 12 he was promised to his future wife, although he had already fallen in love with another girl whom he called Beatrice. Although they would never be together, Dante s love for Beatrice was to inspire his greatest poetry.

As a young man Dante fought in the wars that there were always going on between rival cities and became involved in the struggle for political power in Florence . Beatrice married another man, and then, when she was just 24, she died. Dante was heartbroken. He withdrew into intense study and began composing poems dedicated to her memory. In 1295 Dante s political enemies won power in Florence, and he had to leave the city for ever.

Now a political exile Dante wandered from city to city. He began to write The Divine Comedy, a long story poem that describes an imaginary journey made by Dante through the three worlds of the afterlife— Hell, purgatory and heaven. His guide for most of the journey is the ancient roman poet Virgil, but in the heaven he is reunited with the long dead Beatrice.

As well as providing a fascinating insight into the beliefs of people living in medieval Europe. The Divine Comedy has inspired generations of writers and other artists with its beautiful language and moving love story.

Xxx. Subham. Xxxx

HINDU FESTIVALS CROSS WORD PUZZLE (Post No.5616)

Written by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 2 November 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London – 16-53

Post No. 5616

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

IN THIS HINDU FESTIVAL CROSSWORD PUZZLE, THERE ARE OVER 15 NAMES OF HINDU FESTIVALS. JUST TO HELP YOU FIND THE WORDS, I HAVE NUMBERED THE STARTING POINTS.

 

I HAVE GIVEN THE SOLUTION BELOW THE PUZZLE.

1 2 3 4
XXX 5 6
7
8
9 10 11
12
13 14
15
16
17

SOLUTION:–

 

HINDU FESTIVAL NAMES

1.RAKSHABANDAN; 2.SHIVRATRI; 3.NAVARATRI; 4.ONAM

5.HOLI; 6.DIWALI; 7.RAMNAVAMI; 8.VIJAYADASAMI

9.DURGA PUJA; 10.UGADI; 11.BOGI

12.NAGAPANCHAMI; 13.MELA;  14.JANMASHTAMI;

15.EKADASI; 16.SANKRANTI (PONGAL); 17.GANESH CHATURTI

XXX  KUMB MAY BE JOINED WITH MELA (NO.13)

1

R

A K S2 H A B A N D H A N3 O4
K H

5

O L I L A W I D6 A N
U I M A V A N M A R7 V A
M V8 I J A Y A D A S A M
B D

9

U

10

R G A P U J A R 11

B

12

N

A G A P A N C H A M I A O
I M

13

A T H S A M N A J

14

T G
E D R E

15

K A D A S I R I
L I I T N A R K N A S

16

I I
17

G

A N E S H C H A T U R T I

–SUBHAM–

London Tribute to Iron Man of India (Post No.5609)

 

Compiled  by London Swaminathan

swami_48@yahoo.com

Date: 31 October 2018

GMT Time uploaded in London – 21-16

Post No. 5609

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog

Evening Standard of London has published a beautiful short write up on Sardar Vallabbhai Patel on the day Prime minister Narendra Modi opened the tallest statue in the world. Here is what Lord Gadhia wrote in today’s paper
Today, the world’s tallest statue, the Statue of Unity, is unveiled in India by prime minister Narendra Modi, standing more than twice as high as the Statue of Liberty, the man honoured with this likeness is Vallabhbhai Patel — one of India s founding fathers and the first deputy prime minister of India.

His most visible legacy was integrating 552 princely states which had the option to join either India or Pakistan or remain independent. This required a blend of determination, skilful diplomacy and steely resolve, earning him the sobriquet the Iron Man of India.

The last viceroy Louis Mountbatten, refereed to this achievement in glowing terms. He said “had you failed, the results would have been disastrous “.

However, Patel was a man of many talents. He became India’s first deputy prime minister and home minister, served as the supreme commander of the armed force s ,and established the Indian Civil Service. But he started out as a freedom fighter.

Patel’s participation in the freedom movement came at considerable personal cost. He was imprisoned by the British many times, and his wife succumbed to cancer when he was 33. He gave up a place to study law in London to his elder brother. Although the latter fulfilled this ambition, coming top of his class in Middle Temple , and he even fortified the opportunity to become prime minister at Gandhi s request.

A 300 million pound statue might be viewed as a vanity project but some of the cost is being offset by collecting scrap Iron from farmers across India. And the monument is expected to become a major tourist attraction.

India is vast, and its 29 states could easily be separate countries, yet it has remained unified and a democracy— despite the many forces pulling in different directions.

This is India s real miracle, avoiding fragmentation. Although Patel s Statue metres, his reputation as the unifier of an independent India stands far taller.

Writer Baron Gadhia, an investment banker, was made a life peer in 2016

Evening Standard dated 31 October 2018

ரமண மஹரிஷி பற்றி அரவிந்தர்! (Post No.5598)

WRITTEN BY S NAGARAJAN

Date: 28 October 2018

Time uploaded in London – 5-45 AM (British Summer Time)

Post No. 5598

Pictures shown here are taken from various sources including google, Wikipedia, Facebook friends and newspapers. This is a non- commercial blog.

ரமண மஹரிஷி பற்றி அரவிந்தர்!

ச.நாகராஜன்

1

திலிப் குமார் ராய் பிரபல இசைக் கலைஞர். பல புத்தகங்களை எழுதியவர். பக்தர்.

ரமண மஹரிஷி பக்தியை ஞானமாதா என்று கூறுவதை அவர் கேட்டு மிகவும் பக்தி கொண்டார்.

திலிப் அரவிந்த ஆசிரமத்தில் இருந்த போது முதன் முதலில் ரமணரைப் பற்றி  கேள்விப்பட்டார். அரவிந்தரிடம் அவர் ரமணரைப் பற்றிக் கேட்டபோது அரவிந்தர் மிக குறிப்பிடத்தகுந்த பெரும் வலிமை வாய்ந்த யோகி ரமணர் என்றும் அவரது தவமே இந்திய வெற்றிக்கு வழி வகுத்தது என்றும் குறிப்பிட்டார். இன்னொரு சமயம் அவர் யோகிகளில் ‘ரமணர் ஹெர்குலிஸ்’ என்று கூறினார். ஆகவே தான் அவரை தரிசிக்க ரமணாசிரமம் செல்ல வேண்டும் என்ற ஆவல் எனக்குள் ஏற்பட்டது.

திலிப் குமார் ராய் ரமணர் பற்றிக் குறிப்பிட்டதை அவர் சொற்களிலேயே கீழே காணலாம்:

Dilip Kumar Roy of Sri Aurobindo Ashram was a well-known personality of his time and has authored many books. He was a bhakta and a musician. Sri Ramana’s famous quote, “Bhakti is

jnanamata”(the mother of jnana) was in reply to his query whether Sri Ramana advocated jnana and disparaged bhakti.

I first heard of Ramana Maharshi when I was a member of the Ashram of Sri Aurobindo. I asked Sri Aurobindo about the Maharshi and he wrote back that he was a yogi of remarkable strength and attainments and that his tapasya had won ‘glory for India.’ On another occasion he

characterised him as a ‘Hercules among the yogis.’ So I longed to pay a visit to Sri Ramanasramam.

2

.

அரவிந்தருடன் மாலை நேரங்களில் அவரை தரிசித்து அவரிடம் சந்தேகங்களைக் கேட்டுத் தெளிவு படுத்திக் கொள்வது 1938இல் சாத்தியமாக இருந்தது.

23-12 1938

சாதகர் ஒருவர் ரமணாசிரமத்தைப் பற்றிப் பேச ஆரம்பித்தார்.

ரமண மஹரிஷி வாழ்வில் நடந்த ஒரு சம்பவத்தை அரவிந்தர் விவரித்தார்.

ஆசிரமச் செயல்பாட்டிலும் பக்தர்கள் நடந்து கொண்ட விதத்திலும் சற்று அதிருப்தி கொண்ட ரமணர் மலையை நோக்கி  மெதுவாக நடக்க ஆரம்பித்தார். குன்றின் இடையே ஒரு சிறு இடைவெளியை அவர் கடக்க வேண்டியிருந்தது. அந்த இடைவெளியில் காலை குறுக்காக நீட்டி வைத்துக் கொண்டு ஒரு வயதான கிழவி அமர்ந்திருந்தாள். மஹரிஷி அவரது காலை எடுக்குமாறு வேண்டினார். ஆனால் அவரோ மறுத்தார். மஹரிஷி அவரைக் கோபத்துடன் கடக்க யத்தனித்தார். கோபம் கொண்ட கிழவி, ”ஏன் இப்படி  அமைதியற்று இருக்கிறாய்? அருணாசலத்தில் ஒரு இடத்தில் அமர்ந்து கொண்டு இருக்காமல் ஏன் இப்படி அலைகிறாய்? திரும்பிப் போ, சிவனை அங்கே வழிபடேன்” என்றார்.

கிழவியின் பேச்சு ரமணரின் சிந்தனையைத் தூண்டி விட்டது. அவர் திரும்பி வழி நடந்தார். சிறிது தூரம் சென்ற பின் அவர் திரும்பிப் பார்த்த போது அந்தக் கிழவியை அங்கே காணோம். அப்போது தான் அவருக்கு திடீரென்று தோன்றியது, மஹா சக்தியே கிழவி ரூபத்தில் அங்கு வந்து அவருக்கு அருணாசலத்திலேயே இருக்குமாறு அருளியதாக!

The talk turned to Ramanashram.


Sri Aurobindo:


There are reports that those who stay there permanently are not all in agreement with each other. Do you know that famous story about Maharshi “when being disgusted with the Ashram and the disciples,” he was going away into the mountain. He was passing through a narrow path flanked by the hills. He came upon an old woman sitting with her legs across the path. Maharshi begged her to draw her legs but she would not. Then Maharshi in anger passed across her. She then became very angry and said “Why are you so restless? Why can’t you sit in one place at Arunachala instead of moving about, go back to your place and worship Shiva there?” Her remarks struck him and he retraced his steps. After going some distance he looked back and found that there was nobody. Suddenly it struck him that it was the Divine Mother herself who wanted him to remain at Arunachala.

Of course it was the Divine Mother who asked him to go back. Maharshi was intended to lead this sort of life. He has nothing to do with what happens around him. He remains calm and detached. The man is what he was.

.

3

ஒவ்வொரு கணத்திலும் மஹாசக்தியே ரமணரை வழி நடத்தி வந்தாள். ஆசிரமம் ஆரம்பிப்பதிலோ அல்லது அதை நடத்துவதிலோ ரமணருக்கு அவ்வளவாக ஈடுபாடு இல்லை. ஆனால் மஹாசக்திக்கோ அவர் மூலமாக பல்லாயிரக்கணக்கான பக்தர்களுக்கு அருள் பாலிக்க வேண்டும் என்ற சங்கல்பம் இருந்தது.

ஒரு கட்டத்தில், “என்னை இம்சிக்கிறா” என்று கூறிய ரமணர், அந்த இம்சையை அன்னையின் கட்டளையாக சிரமேற்கொண்டு ஆசிரமத்தை நடத்த அனுமதி தந்தார் – ஆனால் ஆசிரம விதிமுறைகளை  மிகக் கடுமையாகப் பின்பற்றினாலும் அதில் பற்று சிறிதுமின்றி இருந்தார்.

அற்புதமான ரமண அவதாரம் பராசக்தியின் சங்கல்பம் என்றே முடிவு செய்யலாம்.

***

ஆதாரம் : EVENING TALKS with SRI AUROBINDO – Recorded by A. B. PURANI