Biggest Loss of the Hindus- Wonderful Soma Plant! (Post No.4009)

Written by London Swaminathan
Date: 17 June 2017
Time uploaded in London- 14-50
Post No. 4009
Pictures are taken from various sources such as Face book, Wikipedia and newspapers; thanks.
contact: swami_48@yahoo.com

 

Most wonderful herb in the world is the Soma herb. Hindus must rediscover the Soma plant; it must be somewhere in the Himalayas or beyond the Himalayan Mountains. The whole ninth Mandala of the Rig Veda and the later literature praise it sky high. It has got miraculous effects. Had it been a narcotic drug, Hindus would have replaced it with opium or similar drugs. Had it been identified, foreigners would have made billions of dollars, by bottling the juice for sale. Vedic Hindus knew it; but in the modern times, It is not identified yet and it is not found yet. So Hindus must rediscover it through serious research.

Parsees also praised Soma plant in Zend Avesta. It is unique to Indian sub continent. Since Zoroaster migrated from Saurashtra region of Gujarat, he knew the miraculous properties of the Soma plant (See Kanchi Shankaracharya’s lecture on Zoroaster)

Here is the gist of Ninth Mandala of Rig Veda where 114 hymns praise the Soma herb.

Immortality

The juice of the plant is an immortal draught, which the gods love. Soma, the god in the juice, is said to clothe the naked and heal the sick, though him the blind see, and the lame walk. Many other divine attributes are ascribed to him. He is addressed as a god in the highest strains of veneration. All powers belong to him; all blessings are besought of him as his to bestow.

 

He is said to be divine, immortal and to confer immortality on gods and men. Future happiness is asked from him:

“Place me Oh, Pavamana, in that ever lasting and imperishable world where there is eternal light and glory” -RV 9-113-7

 

Gave God Like Powers

Soma sharpened the sense. Gods, men and angels enjoyed it, especially Indra and Maruts, Yama and the Pitrs/ancestors (This mantra shows it is not alcoholic drink because gods and ancestors are included). The potent juice of the Soma plant which endowed the feeble mortal with god-like powers.

 

The gods bought soma in the eastern direction. Thence he is generally bought in the eastern direction.

Number 17

The Adhvaryu priest draws 17 cups of Soma plant and the Nesthri 17 cups of Sura (alcohol), for to Prajapati belong these two plants, to wit the Soma and Sura – and of these two the Soma is TRUTH, PROSPERITY, LIGHT and the Sura is untruth, misery, darkness.

(This Satapata Brahmana mantra explains the bad effect of alcohol and the good effects of Soma- SB 5-1-2-10/14)

 

Girl and Soma

There are many symbolic stories about Soma which confused and baffled the foreigners; they started blabbering like drunkards when they read these passages!

“King Soma lived among the Gandharvas. The gods and rishis (seers) deliberated as to how the king might be induced to return to them. Vach—the goddess of the speech said—The Ganharvas lust after women. I shall therefore transform myself in to a woman and then you will sell me to them in exchange d for Soma (Aitareya Brahmana)

In the Taittiriya Brahmana, Vach is turned into a woman one year old, and induced to come back again by singing, and hence women love a man who sings”

The meaning is those who have lust cannot have Soma.

 

Such symbolic stories made the foreigners crazy and stated writing rubbish. Their Vedic translations have become a big Joke Book now!

Satapata Brahmana says (3-2-41)

Soma formerly lived in the sky, whilst the gods were on earth. They desired to get it that they employ it in sacrifice. The Gayatri flew to bring it to them (Gayatri is the most powerful mantra found in all the four Vedas, which was discovered by a Non Brahmin; Brahmins recite it three times a day until today). While she was carrying it off, the Gandharva Vibhanasu robbed her of it. The gods became aware of it and knowing the partiality of the Gandharvas for females, they sent a Vach (Word) to get it from them and the word succeeded in doing it.

 

There are hundreds of pages with symbolic mantras like it about Soma. No where in the world a narcotic drug is treated like this. If it is a drug they would have consumed it and the race would have perished. But Vedic civilization is alive today! That is the only civilization alive today from among the ancient civilizations!!

 

Fragrant Flowers!

 

The Soma is a creeping plant, with small white fragrant flowers. It yields a milky juice, which is filtered and mixed with milk. While they press the plants for juice, they recite mantras. They sing the praise of it and pour it in the sacrificial fire. They even named the different vessels and spoons in the Soma sacrifice.

Various accounts are given of the way in which the Soma plant was obtained. Soma plant is brought from the mountains by an eagle, says the scriptures. Some passages say it is with the Gandharvas. Other passages say it is brought from a mountain by sellers. Foreigners bluffed about these things without understanding the hidden meaning.

When Soma was brought to the gods, there was a dispute  as to who should have the first draught. It was decided that a race should be run.; the winner to have first taste. Vayu first reached the goal, Indra came second

 

Soma juice purifies the mind, says a Tamil inscription. Soma Yaga performers were gifted with a white umbrella meaning that person is equal to a king; in those days, only kings and gods can have white umbrella. White umbrella stands for purity, authority and intelligence.

 

Soma also meant Moon. Hindus only connect plants with the moon. Future research will establish this fact and the Hindus would get the credit. So far only sun is linked with the plants because it helps them in photosynthesis.

 

–Subham–

 

Drought in Tamil and Sanskrit Literature (Post No.3953)

Research Article Written by London Swaminathan

 

Date: 29 May 2017

 

Time uploaded in London- 14-36

 

Post No. 3953

 

Pictures are taken from various sources such as Face book, Wikipedia and newspapers; thanks.

 

contact: swami_48@yahoo.com

 

Our forefathers and writers gave a true account of the weather conditions prevailing in those days. These true accounts prove that they wrote genuine things and not concocted anything. We have reports of Tsunamis, earth quakes, accidents, shipwrecks, massive engineering works such as diverting River Ganga (by Bhageeratha) and River Kaveri (by Agastya), laying roads through the Vindhya Hills (Agastya ), population explosion in North India and migrating to South east Asia (Agastya drank sea) etc. Only thing is people could not understand their symbolic language. They though these are all mythological ‘stories’.

 

If we read through our literature, we can see many droughts which caused massive migrations. We even come to know the drying of Saraswati river ended the Indus Valley civilization and they migrated to different parts of India. These are very important events to know the history of the land.

Massive drought resulted in the migration of people from the Saraswati River Valley during Vedic days. Brahmins in India are generally divided into 10 groups: Pancha Goawda and Pancha Dravida. Gowda Brahmins lived in North India and Dravida Brahmins lived in South India. It is all in our literature. Many droughts caused the migration of Brahmins from one part of the country to the other.

 

Hindus believed that the 12 year orbit of Jupiter around the sun caused a drought every twelve years. Position of Venus was also considered to measure the amount of rain.

Tevaram sung by three Saivite saints mentioned the drought in different parts of Tamil Nadu. Lord Siva helped the saints by providing huge quantity of paddy and gold coins, which are considered great miracles by the Tamils. Those  1400 year old Tevaram verses are sung by all the Saivaite Tamils even today.

 

The word for drought in Sanskrit is Varkadam. In Tamil we have Varatchi and it is related to Varkata.

 

Tamil Tiruvilaiyaadal Purana talks about the drought in and around Madurai.

 

Kalidasa and Tamil Sangam Literature

Kalidasa and other poets used drought followed by rains as similes in their poems.

रावणावग्रहक्लान्तमिति वागमृतेन सः।
अभिवृष्य मरुत्सस्यम् कृष्णमेघस्तिरोदधे॥ १०-४८

rāvaṇāvagrahaklāntamiti vāgamṛtena saḥ।
abhivṛṣya marutsasyam kṛṣṇameghastirodadhe || 10-48

rAvaNAvagrahaklAntamiti vAgamR^itena saH|
abhivR^iShya marutsasyam kR^iShNameghastirodadhe || 10-48

 

On showering ambrosian water called his speech on the desiccating crop called gods owing to the drought called Ravana, he that black cloud called Vishnu disappeared.

Rain=speech, dry crops=gods, drought caused by=Ravana, Black Cloud=Vishnu

 

Tamil poet Alankudi Vanganar used the same simile in Natrinai verse 230. A man came back to his wife after visiting a courtesan. She told that the very sight of him is like rain flooding the land affected by drought.

 

Raghuvamsa 10-48= Natrinai 230

 

Sangam Tamil poets (Pura nanauru 35, 383 and 397) say that even if the planet Venus is seen in the wrong direction there wont be any drought because of the just rule of the kings. This shows their belief n the position of Venus in the sky.

 

12 long Drought and Indus Valley Civilization

 

There is an interesting reference to the drying of River Saraswati, the mighty river which ran through Punjab, Uttapradesh and other states.

 

Sarasvata, son of Dadhichi and Sarasvata survived a twelve year long drought. But all other rishis had gone away  in search of food. They had forgotten the Vedas completely. Then Sarasvata rishi taught them the Vedas (Mahabharata 9-51). This gives credit to the story of Vedic Hindus migration from the Indus valley to other parts of India after a 12 year long drought. Story of Saraswata Brahmins’ origin also corroborates this.

 

During the reign of Ukra Kumara Pandya, a legendary king, there was a 12 year long drought. Then he went and prayed to Agastya. He showed them the way.

 

The reference to 12 year long drought and once in 12 year drought are plenty in our literature.

Two droughts during Tevaram days

 

Tevaram is a collection f hymns sung by three saints Sambadar, Appar and Sundarar.

 

Sambandar and Appar were contemporaries who lived during seventh century CE. Because of drought and famine they went to Siva temple and prayed for the sake of the people. They were given one coin each till they tided over the famine. They used the coins to buy food articles.

 

Sundarar, who lived later than Appar and Sambadar , was getting regular  supply of paddy  from a generous Shiva devotee.  Suddenly he stopped it due to a severe drought. When Sundara came to know about it, he was very much worried. Lord Shiva appeared in the dream of that philanthropist and promised him a good supply of paddy. The very next day he went to nearby Tiruvarur and informed Sundara about the miracle. When Sundara saw the huge hills of paddy I a village he was wondering ow to carry them. Shiva told him that the paddy would be in Tiruarur. His words came true and every house in Tiruarur had a heap of paddy in front of his/her house. Sundara was very happy to see the delivery at the doorstep.

–SUBHAM–

 

Venkai Tree is Tiger: Kalidasa and Tamil Poets Imagine! (Post No.3884)

  

Written by London Swaminathan

 

Date: 6 May 2017

 

Time uploaded in London: 21-05

 

Post No. 3884

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

 

The word ‘Venkai; means a Venaki tree and a tiger in Tamil. The surprising thing about the word is that it is called Venga (benga) even in Western Nepal. So, my favourite hypothesis that Sanskrit and Tamil were the original languages of the world and you can trace any old word to these two languages – is confirmed once again.

 

My next favourite hypothesis that Kalidasa lived well before Tamil Sangam age is confirmed once again in this Venkai-Asana tree (Pterocarpus marsupium) comparison. I have been showing that over 200 similes of Kalidasa were used by 400+ Sangam Tamil poets

 

The Venkai tree and its surrounding ground with its flowers looks like a tiger according to Kalidasa and Sangam Tamil poets. Tamil poets are very familiar with this image. We have got lot of this images in Sangam Literature.

The Venaki tree in the field blossoms in the season for marriages of olden days and for the harvest of the fields. So, it has some significance in the life of the villagers. One of the Tamil poets says “One day in her usual overheard speech, the lady companion enquires the heroine why her mother prayed that the Venkai tree should blossom and immediately looked at her face. She thereby suggests to the overhearing hero that her mother may thereafter restrain her daughter from going to the field and thereby indirectly urges him to marry soon” (Natrinai 206)

 

Here are some scenes from Sangam Tamil Poetry:

 

“A block of rock covered with Venaki blossoms looks like the coloured spots and stripes on the tiger’s skin (Kuruntokai.202)

“The elephant hears the blended notes of the musical notes of the musicians and mistakes it for the roar of a tiger, gets angry, attacks a blossomed Venkai tree, tears off one of its branches and wearing it on its head makes a roar that echoes in the mountain rocks” (Pathitrupathu -41)

 

“There is a picture of an impenetrably dark night on a mountain in which the tiger springing from its lair attacks and kills an elephant, drinks its blood and cleans its mouth rubbing it against the trunk of the Venkai” (Natrinai 158)

 

The name Venkai denotes the tiger (also the tree) and it is a wondrous sight that the blossomed tree resembles the tiger with its dots and stripes Purananuru 202. This fact has attracted the imagination of many poets of the age and they have described the elephants attacking with vengeance or running away from the tree mistaken for a tiger (Pura.202, Kali.38, Aka.12). Poet Senkannanar has put this image in a nutshell in the three words ‘Venakiyum puli Iindrana’ meaning that the tree has given birth to a (blossomed) tiger (Natrinai 389)

 

 

The poet, Netuven Nilavinar (Kuruntokai 47), in an apostrophe to the moon, says,

“The lady companion addresses the moon and states that it is not favourable to the hero’s coming to her at night, since it is so bright that even the rock whereon the Venaki flowers have fallen and spread appears bright and clear and looks like a tiger cub, and may, in her opinion, frighten him when he comes that way.”

 

“An angry elephant attacks a Venkai tree and destroys its branches (thinking it as a tiger); the branches are not broken but only bent to the ground; the branches continue to blossom and the girls find it easy to pluck the flowers standing on the ground (Kuru.208). This picture is in the utterance of the heroine suggesting the companion that the hero has caused her untold sufferings but has been merciful enough to make her still live without perishing and undergo some more sufferings by others”.

 

Asana (Venkai in Tamil) Tree in Kalidasa

In the Raghu Vamsa (9-63), the spotted tigers rushing onward appeared like the branches of Asana Tree, full of reddish yellow blossoms, broken and blown off by the wind, says Kalidasa.

 

व्याघ्रानभीरभिमुखोत्पतितान्गुहाभ्यः
फुल्लासनाग्रविटपानिव वायुरुग्णान्।
शिक्षाविशेषलघुहस्ततया निमेषा
त्तुणीचकार शरपुरितवक्त्ररन्ध्रान्॥ ९-६३

vyāghrānabhīrabhimukhotpatitānguhābhyaḥ
phullāsanāgraviṭapāniva vāyurugṇān |
śikṣāviśeṣalaghuhastatayā nimeṣā
ttuṇīcakāra śarapuritavaktrarandhrān || 9-63

 

In consequence of the agility of the hand from long practice, the dauntless king in the twinkling of the eye turned the wide opened mouth of tigers into quivers, as it were, of those tigers that rushed upon him from their caves, by filling their mouth cavities with arrows, and made them resemble the blossom laden branches of the Asana trees broken down by the wind. [9-63]

 

Both the tigers and Asana tree branches with flowers have a colourful look.

 

Though I have come across only one reference to Tiger and the tree in Raghuvamsa, there are references to the tree in his other works.

 

–Subham–

Women are Cuckoos: Kalidasa and Tamil Poets agree! (Post No.3881)

Written by London Swaminathan

 

Date: 5 May 2017

 

Time uploaded in London: 14-12

 

Post No. 3881

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

Women are Cuckoos (Koels) say Kalidasa and other poets. Is it a compliment or a complaint? Both, I would say.

When the poets want to praise them, they say that women’s voice is like the Koel (Cuckoo). When they wanted to attack their cunningness, they say women are as cunning as a cuckoo!

 

There is a popular couplet in Sanskrit:

“The crow is black and the cuckoo is black. What is the difference between the two? It is when spring arrives that the crow is identified and the cuckoo is identified as cuckoo” (by their harsh and sweet voice)

 

kakah krsnah pikah krshnah ko bedhah pikakakayoho

vasanta kale samprapta Kakah kakah pikah pikah

 

Kalidasa in his most famous work, Shakuntalam says, “king Speaks,

Intuitive cunning is seen even in females

of lower creatures; what then of those

endowed with reason and understanding;

the cuckoo, as we know, has her young reared

by other birds before they take to the air”

(Shakuntalam Act 5- 22)

 

The voice of cuckoo is sweet but cuckoo is cunning by nature. In the Raghuvamsa (12-39), Surpanakha speaks in sweet voice as that of a cuckoo. But she is planning cunningly to capture Rama and Lakshmana by her magical wile.

 

in the Shakuntalam drama women are portrayed as tricky as cuckoo. Intuitive cunningness exists even in females other than humans (species of animals and birds). What then in regard to those that possess power of understanding? The female cuckoos indeed, cause their offspring to be reared by other birds, before flying in the sky (AS 5-22 and Malavikagni Mitram 3-41)

 

In hundreds of places, the poets described the voice of women is as sweet as a cuckoo.

 

In one of the verses in Niti Venba, a collection of didactic poems by an anonymous author, the poet says “a person’s nature can’t be known by his appearance but known only by his speech like we know a crow from a cuckoo from its difference in voice.”

 

–Subham–

 

 

 

Follow the Habits of a Crow: Tamil Poets’ Advice (Post No.3878)

Written by London swaminathan

Date: 4 May 2017

Time uploaded in London: 22-07

Post No. 3878

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

Tamil poets use several birds or their habits to teach certain morals to the society. Tiruvalluvar, the author of the Tamil Veda ‘Tirukkural’ send us two messages using the crow:

The crow does not hide what it has got, but cries out to is fellows, before it eats

Prosperity among men will come only to those who have this disposition (Kural 527)

The message is “Go to the crow and learn, you selfish man”.

In another couplet, he says,

“A crow may overcome a much stronger bird, the owl, during day time,

Even so, at the right opportunity, the king could succeed easily in his campaigns” (481)

It is said that in the nocturnal fight, the owl could easily beat the crow; but if the fight takes place during the day time, the crow will be the victor. There is a story to this effect in the Panchatantra. Asvattama also used this tactic to kill important Pandava family members (see below my Mahabharata article link)

Follow the Six Points

Another Tamil poet lists six points in a four-line verse:

1.Get up early in the morning

2.Do sex like the crows, unseen by anyone

3.Take a bath everyday like the crow

4.When you have food call everyone

5.Come back to ‘your house’ (don’t go to other women)

6.Socialise like crows (they sit in a line and caw)

The crying of crows when it sees food and sharing it with others have been noticed by many other poets. They also praised the crows.

 

My articles on Crows

 

What can a Crow Teach You?

Date : 5  August  2015

Strange Belief about Crows in India and Britain!!

Research Article No. 1678; Dated 26 February 2015.

 

Strange Bird Stories in Mahabharata!

Research Article no. 1711; dated 12 March 2015

 

பிரிட்டனில் கா கா ஜோதிடம்! மேலும் ஒரு அதிசயம்!!

Research Article No. 1679; Dated 27 February 2015.

 

கா…கா…கா…!!! கா..கா..கா..!!!

28 March 2013

 

–Subham–

Kashmir Minister’s Sacrifice Saved the King! (Post No.3872)

Written by London swaminathan

Date: 2 May 2017

Time uploaded in London: 21-35

Post No. 3872

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

We have read about the great sacrifice of Dadhichi Rishi (see) who sacrificed his backbone to make Vajrayudha weapon to kill the bad people. We have heard about the sacrifice of eyes by Tamil saint Kannappa Nayanar and Mahavishnu. We also know the sacrifice of head by Dadhyank in the Rig Veda. But not many people know the great sacrifice of Devasarman the minister of Kashmiri King Jeyapida who ruled Kashmir around 750 CE.

Kalhana gives a graphic account of his sacrifice in his book Rajatarangni (River of Kings) in Sanskrit

From the Fourth Taranga (Chapter):

Jayapida invaded Nepal; but the King Aramudi did not fight with him. He was skilled in magic and statecraft. He retired to a great distance from his army. Jeyapida also followed him. Aramudi went to the other side of a river and beat the war drums. Jeyapida’s army crossed the knee-deep water in the river. Suddenly the water level rose from the tides of the sea. Aramudi was waiting for this moment; He caught the king from the middle of the flooded river. Jeyapida did not know the territory but Aramudi skilfully drew him to a place near the eastern ocean. Jeyapida’s army was washed away into the sea.

 

Kashmiris use Drti (Inflated skin) to cross the river; it was the primitive method to cross a river or stream. it is inexpensive because they use the buffalo skin to make this skin bag.

 

Jeyapida was imprisoned in a stone building on the bank of the River Kalagandika. The natural sceneries were so beautiful, Jeyapida composed slokas (couplets) on it. Kashmiris were reciting those slokas, at least until the days of Kalhana. Rajatarangini says his slokas were melting hearts.

Jeyapida had a very wise minister called Devasarman. He sent emissaries to the Nepalese King Aramudi. Devasarman told the Nepalese king that Jeyapida’s treasure would be given to him. Since the army is holding the war booty he had brought the entire army to the other side of the river bank. Nepalese King Aramudi believed all these things.

 

Devasarman had a different plan. After getting the permission of Aramudi, he went and saw Jeyapida.

 

Devasarman told Jeyapida:

“I hope you have not lostyour personal bravery; for it exists like mural support for frescoes, the plans of perilous adventure will be successful”

Jeyapida replied to him: “O minister! thus segregated and without arms what wonderful act could I do even if I were possessed of courage”

Devasarman said: Are you capable of, after falling into the waters of the river from this window, of going to the further bank? For your own army is there.”

The King said to him: “After falling from here one cannot come to the surface of the water without an inflated skin (Drti) and in this place even the inflated skin would burst owing to the distance of the fall.”

 

Then after consideration the minister said to him: “Stay out side for two nalikas (48 minutes). Then the minister entered the room alone and killed himself; He has written with his blood:

I am the inflated skin for you; the body is filled with breath, it having been destroyed just now, mount me and cross the river; to serve as a hold for your thighs when mounted, the turban has been tied by me around my own loins, get into this and jump at once into the water”.

Such was the direction tied to the neck with a strip of cloth, written in blood, torn with the nails from his limbs, which he saw and deciphered.

 

At first the king was surprised and shocked, but later without wasting time jumped into the waters and reached his army. His army went into Nepalese territory and defeated Aramudi. Thus, the minister sacrificed his own life and saved Jeyapida.

–Subham–

 

Dravidian Magician in Kashmir: Kalhana’s Strange Story! (Post No.3869)

Written by London swaminathan

Date: 1 May 2017

Time uploaded in London: -12-21

Post No. 3869

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

Kalhana, the 12th century historian and author of Rajatarangni mentioned DRAVIDIAN in three places. There is a very interesting story about a Dravidian magician in his book Rajatarangini (River of Kings).

 

It is a true story according to Kalhana and it happened during the reign of Jayapida (751 CE).

 

From Fourth Taranga (Chapter) of Rajatarangini:

On one occasion, to the king who had acquired glory in all directions a certain person of divine figure spoke in a dream with folded hands:

“O King! in your realm I have been residing in comfort with my relatives; I am the Lord of the Nagas called Mahapadma, I come to you for asylum.

 

‘A certain Dravidian spell-monger is trying to draw me away from here in order to sell me for money in the Territory of Maru (desert) which yearns for water.

If you save me from him, I shall show in your country, a hill which produces god ore. The king having heard it in the dream, despatched spies in all directions the very next day. King’s spies found him and brought him before the king (Jayapida).

 

Ulur Lake Near Sri Nagar, Kashmir, India (also known as Wular)

When he confessed his intention, the king pardoned him. The king asked the Dravidian spell-monger (magician):

“How is it possible for you to draw out this Naga, who excels in spiritual power,  from the interior of the lake which extends for several Yojanas?”

Dravidian magician said to the king, “O, King! Inconceivable are the powers of the spell (mantra). If you desire to see it, come and see the marvel.

 

 

The king followed the magician to the lake. The Dravidian muttered incantations and then shot some arrows. The lake became dry. Then the king could see a snake (Naga) about a span in size with a human face, which was wriggling in the mud surrounded by several small snakes.

 

O King! I am going to catch him now. But the king ordered him not to catch the snake. At once the Dravidian spell monger (magician) withdrew the power of his spell and the lake became full. (The Vulur/Wular lake was called the Mahapadma lake after this naga who was supposed to live in it).

 

King disposed the magician by paying him some money.

 

The king was expecting the Naga to show him the Hill of Gold ore. But it did not happen. When the king asked him about it Mahapadma Naga said, “I asked for asylum; you did not give me asylum; but you drove away the spell-monger. So I will show you the hill of copper. When the king got the directions to it, he excavated copper from Kramarajya Hill and struck a hundred crores of Dinnaras (coins)”.

 

Dravidian Brahmins

In another chapter Kalhana referred to Dravids (Dravidian Brahmins in Kashmir). Until Max Muller and Caldwell gave the wrong connotations for the words Dravidian and Aryan, the words meant only A South Indian (Dravida) , A cultured person or ascetics of Himalayas ( aryan) in Indian literature.

Following is the reference found in Eighth Taranga (chapter)

“The daughter’s son of the chief of Karapatha settled in this place (Simhapura). Brahmans born in Indus region as well as Dravid Brahmans who formerly lived in the centre of siddhacchatra.”

 

Translator R S Pandit adds a footnote: As late as the 12th century Dravid Brahmans are mentioned as students in Kashmir.

 

My old articles on Kalhana’s Rajatarangini and Kashmir

 

1.Who are Dravidians? | Tamil and Vedas

https://tamilandvedas.com/2013/07/17/who-are-dravidians/

17 Jul 2013 – He says ‘Pancha Dravida‘ means the Brahmins of Gujarat, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. Here again the word …

 

 

2.Ramayana cures Curses! Rajatarangini Episode! (Post No.3754); Date: 24 March 2017

 

3.Kaliyuga Calculation: Kalhana’s Blunder!

Post No: 1574: Dated 14th January 2015

 

4.Nehru on Rajatarangini; Article No.1465; Dated 7th December 2014.

 

5.Kashmiri King who attacked Tamil Nadu and Sri Lanka; Article No.1468; Dated 8th December 2014.

 

(6). 106 Kings of Hindu Kashmir!; Post No: 1577: Dated 15th January 2015

 

7.Beautiful Names of Ancient Kashmiri Women!; Article No 1583; Dated 17th January 2015.

 

8.Sanskrit in Mahmud of Ghazni Coins!; Article No 1579; Dated 16th January 2015

 

–SUBHAM–

 

Water Images in Kalidasa and Tamil Sangam Literature (Post No.3793)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 6 APRIL 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 18-09

 

Post No. 3793

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

 

Great men think alike. Kalidasa, the most famous poet of India and a Sangam Tamil poet Sempulapeyarnirar use the water image in a beautiful way.

 

Kalidasa in Raghuvamsa says,

 

Water from the sky which is originally of one taste gains diversity of flavours in different regions. Similarly, Hari, being immutable assumes different conditions in different qualities (RV 10-17). The image gives the idea of monism.

 

Sempulap peyal nirar, Tamil poet who lived nearly 2000 years ago, says in Kuruntokai (verse 40):

 

“What are my mother and your mother to each other?

What is the relationship between my father and your father?

How did we come to know each other?

Like the (rain) water which falls on a field with red soil,

(mingle with it and becomes red)

the loving hearts have blended with each other.

 

Kalidasa used it illustrate monism; Tamil poet used it to illustrate the union of hearts.

 

(I have been emphasizing through several articles that Kalidasa lived before the Sangam age, probably around 1st century BCE. I am using 250 plus similes of Sangam poets to illustrate my point and those similes are already in Kalidasa’s seven works).

In the Kumara sambhava (2-25), he says that “the speed of the Wind Gods Maruts can be guessed from their faltering motion as is the stoppage of their current from the refulgence of waters.

 

As the sprouting of a seed requires water before it can make its appearance, similarly, the work of gods can be accomplished by the Cupid in diverting the mind of Siva from meditation towards Parvati (K.S.3-18)

 

Siva, on account of suspension of the vital airs is imagined to be a reservoir of water unruffled with ripples, a cloud not blustering up to burst into a shower, or like a lamp steady in a place free from wind (K.S.3-48)

 

Cupid who died leaving Rati whose very life depends upon him, is imagined as the torrent of water abandoning a lotus after breaking down a dam (K.S. 4-6)

 

The mind already firmly resolute and bent on its desired object cannot be diverted and is so imagined to be like downward flowing water which cannot be drawn back (K S 5-5). So Menaka’s advice to Parvati whose mind already leaned to Siva went amiss.

 

 

Seeing the moon-like face of Parvati, Siva had the water of his mind rendered clear (K S 7-74).

Water is always cool; seers are always kind!

 

In the Raghuvamsa (RV 5-54) Matanga cursed Pri yamvada to turn into an elephant. He fell at his feet and the sage relented afterwards. The hotness of water is due to its contact with the fire or the solar heat; what is coolness is but the natural property of water. This indicates that abut is the sage was kind-hearted.

 

स चानुनीतः प्रणतेन पश्चान्मया महर्षिर्मृदुतामगच्छत्|
उष्णत्वमग्न्यातपसंप्रयोगाच्छैत्यं हि यत्सा प्रकृतिर्जलस्य॥ ५-५४

sa cānunītaḥ praṇatena paścānmayā maharṣirmṛdutāmagacchat
uṣṇatvamagnyātapasaṁprayogācchaityaṁ hi yatsā prakṛtirjalasya || 5-54

“But, when I prostrated before his feet and importuned that great sage matanga relented to modify the curse as above… for the heat of water is owing to its contact with either fire or solar heat… what is coolness is but the natural property of water… isn’t it… [5-54]

 

 

The Sanskrit poets describe navel as a mark of beauty and it therefore, compared to the watery eddy (RV 6-52)

नृपम् तमावर्तमनोज्ञनाभिः सा व्यत्यगादन्यवधूर्भवित्री|
महीधरम् मार्गवशादुपेतम् स्रोतोवहा सागरगामिनीव॥ ६-५२

nṛpam tamāvartamanojñanābhiḥ sā vyatyagādanyavadhūrbhavitrī |

mahīdharam mārgavaśādupetam srotovahā sāgaragāminīva || 6-52

She who has a navel as beautiful as an eddy, and who is scheduled to become another man’s wife, that princess indumati moved past that prince susheNa of shUrasena kingdom, just as an ocean bound river moves past a mountain met by chance on its way. [6-52]

 

 

 

The family of Raghu with the child King comparable to the water with a lotus in the condition of a bud in it (RV 18-37). This indicates the tender and lovely heart of King Sudarsana.

 

नवेन्दुना तन्नभसोपमेयम्
शाबैकसिंहेन च काननेन।
रघोः कुलम् कुट्मलपुष्करेण
तोयेन चाप्रौढनरेन्द्रमासीत्॥ १८-३७

navendunā tannabhasopameyam
śābaikasiṁhena ca kānanena |
raghoḥ kulam kuṭmalapuṣkareṇa
toyena cāprauḍhanarendramāsīt || 18-37

 

That dynasty of Raghu with this young king sudarshana obtained similitude to the sky with new moon, a forest with a single lion-cub, and a lake with solitary bud of lotus. [18-37]

 

Thus Raghu’s line, whose chief was now a child,/Showed like the night while still the Moon is young,/Or like a forest where one Lion-cub/Alone doth range, or as a silent lake/Before its lilies bloom.

 

 

In the Malavikagnimitram (M.M.1-6), the skill of teacher which when communicated to a worthy student, attains greater excellence, is likened to the water of a cloud, which when dropped into a sea-shell, acquires the nature of a pearl.

 

Just as a stupid person becomes wise by association with the wise, similarly, the turbid water becomes clear by contact with the purifying fruit of the Kataka tree (M M 2—7)

 

(Rain drops falling on the day of Swati star becoming pearl in the oysters and the Kataka seed purifying water are used by Tamil poets as well; I have written about it already).

 

Source books :–Kuruntokai

Raghuvamsa.sansrit documents.com

The Imagery of Kalidasa by Dr Mrs Vinod Aggarwal

xxx

My Old articles on the same subject:

1.Kalidasa’s simile in Tamil ‘Kalitokai’ about Water Purification! (Post No.3775); posted on 31 March 2017

2. Women and Rivers in Kalidasa and Tamil literature; posted on 10 November 2014
3. Kalidasa’s age: Tamil works confirm 1st century BC. Posted on 22 January 2012
4. Nature’s Orchestra in the Forest: Sanskrit Tamil Poets’ Chorus (Post No. 3489); 27 December 2016
5. Pearls in the Vedas and Tamil Literature

Posted on Post No. 1048 ; dated 17th May 2014.

  1. Gem Stones in Kalidasa and Tamil Literature (13 February 2012)

 

–Subham–

 

 

Hindu Sages and Hermitages in Kalidasa’s Works (Post No.3779)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 1 April 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 16-27

 

Post No. 3779

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

Kalidasa is superb in describing the conditions of the Tapovanams (Ashram/Hermitage) in ancient India. He is very good in describing the appearance of Hindu seers and their penance. One would love to live in such a condition where there was peace everywhere. Even the animals who have natural enmity between themselves behaved very well. He portrays seers who are not Brahmins as well. He shows us some women seers too.

 

From his seven works, we come to know that people from other castes also did penance and they had obtained equal power. We have such examples earlier in our epics in the characters of Viswamitra, Vrtra of Rig Veda, Ravana and others.

 

In the Valmiki Ramayana and Raghuvamsa (of Kalidasa) we have two examples: one who cursed Dasaratha because he shot down his son mistaking him for an elephant. Another one at the end of the book, who was doing penance hanging upside down. All these portrayals explode the myths of Aryan, Dravidian divisions. Everyone could do penance and obtain powers. Women also did penance as we see in Vikrama Urvasiyam and Kumarasambhava.

Here below are some quotations from his books:-

 

Sakuntalam Act I

King:“Suta, urge the horses on and let us purify ourselves with a sight of the holy Hermitage.

Suta: As your Gracious Majesty orders

King: Suta, even without being told, it is palin that we are now at the outskirts of the penance-groves.

Suta: How can you tell, my lord?

King: Do you not see, sir? Right here:

Grains of wilde rice fallen from tree-hollows

where parrots nest, lie scattered under trees;

those stones here look moist, glossy, from the oil

of Ingudi-nuts split and pounded on them;

all around, deer browse in their tranquil haunts,

unafraid of the chariot’s approach; yonder,

droops of water dripping off the edgs of bark-garments

in long line, trace the paths to pools and streams.

and you see futher

Rippling beneath a passing breeze, waters flow

in deep channels to have the roots of trees;

smoke drifts up from oblations to the Sacred Fire

to dim the soft sheen of tender leaf buds;

free from fear, fawns browse lazily in meadows

beyond where Darbha shoots are closely cropped”

 

This brings us a picture of their simple life. No electricity, no tansport, no mobile internet or TV or Radio! A world full of peace and happiness.

Later Shakuntala , the forest beauty, shows all her love and affection towards he plants and animals in the forest.

 

Act II of Sakuntalam has another beautiful description of the forest and the hermits:-

King: “Let bisons plunge into forest-pools and revel splashing,

striking the water repeatedly with their mighty horns;

let the herds of antelopes clustering in groups in the shade,

chew the cud undisturbed;

and let wild boars lining up round puddles

where the marsh-sedge grows fragrant, root peacefully in the mud

and let this my bow with its loose-knotted string

be allowed to enjoy its well-earned repose.

 

Like sun-crystals cool to the touch

vomit fiery sparks from deep wthin

if struck by another luminous power,

so, hermit’s rich in holiness

in whom Tranquillity presides,

have hidden deep a blazing energy

that leaps out to burn when aroused.

xxx

 

From his Raghuvamsa Kavya,

While the glades are darkening litters of wild boars are coming up from ponds, peacocks are turning towards the trees of their habitation, herds of deer are settling on swards – seeing such back-to-home scenes DilIpa too advanced homewards. [2-17]

xxx

Oh proud lady, this is that pleasure-lake named pacnha-apsara of sage shAtakarNi, which is surrounded with woods, and which appears, on account of the great distance, like the orb of the moon vaguely seen from among the clouds. [13-38]

 

 

Here is the unexcelled ascetic by name sage sutIkShNa, a self-controlled in his action practising asceticism in the centre of five-fires, namely four well-fuelled fires around him and the seven-horsed one, namely the Sun, scorching the forehead as the fifth fire in five-fire method of ascesis. [13-41]

 

Here that sage sutIkShna lifting up his right arm aloft, which has a rosary of rudrAkSha-s for a bracelet, which scratches the deer, and which cuts the sharp needle-ends of kusha-grass, favourably greeted my arrival at his place. [13-43]

 

This sage is a constant sun-gazer and there occurred a momentary disturbance in his gaze when an aircraft passed before his sight; then nodding at my salutation, for he bridles his speech, he again fixed his sight on the thousand-rayed sun.  [13-44]

 

This sanctifying penance-grove which is the refuge of every-body belongs to the sage named Sharabhanga who kept sacred fire and who having propitiated it with the sacred sticks for a long time ultimately offered his own body sanctified with hymns into that ritual fire. [13-45]

 

Now, after Sharabhanga had immolated himself, the task of according hospitality to guests devolved upon the trees of hermitage which were, as it were, the well behaved sons of the sage that removed the fatigue of a journey by offering their shade and that afford abundant fruits of any cherish. [13-46]

 

Oh, curvaceous lady, this chitrakUTa mountain with its mouth of a valley sending forth gurgling sounds of rapids, mud-like rainclouds attached to its horn-like apices, thus resembling a proudish bull whose cavern mouth sends forth a continuous bellowing and the tips of whose horns are smeared with mud dug up while indulging in butting against the side of a mountain, rivets my sight. [13-47]

xxx

 

Sages don’t waste their energy by cursing:

Beholding Rama on throne, the sages did not strike at the demon with their yogic-power; for, it is only in the absence of a protector that the curse-armed ones spend their asceticism. [15-3]

xxx

 

Shudra doing penance

 

Now, the descendant of Ikshvaku saw a certain individual practising asceticism, with bloodshot eyes from smoke, dangling upside down from the branch of a tree. [15-49]

 

On coming to conclusion that this individual deserved execution for his unauthorised performance of asceticism that resulted calamitous to other subjects, then the controller Rama took up his weapon. [15-51]

Rama caused his head, on which the beard and moustache have been singed by the sparks of fire and which therefore resembled a frostbitten lotus with smudged filaments, to be lopped off from the tube-like throat. [15-52]

xxx

Earlier Dasaratha was cursed by a Shudra saint that he would also die of longing for his son.

xxx

From Kumarasambhava (Canto V.15/17)

 

Now let us turn to Kumarasambhava Kavya of Kalidasa:

“And the fawns, fondled by being given handfuls of forest grain, trusted her (UMA) so far, that out of curiosity she could measure the length of her own eyes with theirs before her friends.

 

“Sages came there, desirous of seeing her, who used to take a sacred bath, to offer oblations to the fire, to wear a bark as her upper garment, and to recite sacred texts; age is no consideration in the case of those who are old in spiritual attainments.

 

“The sacred grove, too, became holy, where the previous antipathy between warring beasts was abandoned, where the guests were well gratified with the gifts of desired fruit by the trees, and where the sacred fires were kindled in newly built huts of leaves”

 

One more couplet (V-33)

 

 

Uma is asked:

“Are sacrificial wood and Kusa grass easily obtainable for holy rites? is the water suitable for your bathing? And do you practise austerities proportionate to your strength? For your body is the ultimate means of performing religious duties”

 

This shows not all the people are expected to severe penance. It should be proportionate to one’s physical and mental capacity. But women are also allowed to do penance.

 

There are many more remarks about the penance, penance- groves and seers and sages. My above quotations were only examples to show the attitude of commoners and kings towards sage and their dwelling places.

(For Kalidasa’s works, I have used various English translations–swami)

–Subham–

 

 

 

 

Animal Sex and Akbar’s daughter ! (Post No.3760)

Written by London swaminathan

 

Date: 26 March 2017

 

Time uploaded in London:- 20-50

 

Post No. 3760

 

Pictures are taken from various sources; thanks.

 

contact; swami_48@yahoo.com

 

There is an interesting story about Moghul emperor Akbar’s daughter in a  Tamil book published from Sri Lanka in 1907. It is about sex, titled ‘Goha sastra’ translated by Maharaj Ganga Prasad from Sanskrit.

The author gives many examples for polygamy, unnatural sex and uncontrolled sex. Learning something from animals and birds is nothing new. Krishna’s life history ‘Bhagavata’ itself lists a number of animals and natural objects as teachers. Anonymous author of Viveka Chudamani lists 13 animals as teachers. (See below for my articles on those topics). Tamil Poet Tiruvalluvar quotes umpteen animals and teaches us several things. He says ‘’be a crow when you get food. Call every one and share your food like the crows’’ (Kural 527). Another Tamil poet says ‘’Do sex like crows which cannot be seen by others’’.

Famous English poet William Wordsworth says,

“One impulse from a vernal wood

May teach you more of man,

Of moral evil and of good,

Than all the sages can”.

 

Now about the Birbal’s story:

Akbar’s daughter enjoyed watching nature. She also watched all the cocks and hens inside the palace walls. Every time she watched the cocks were chasing the hens and forced them to have sex. But the hens never wanted it and tried to escape. But other cocks came to chase the previous one for having sex. Then she thought men are after forced sex and I should never marry. She showed least interest in marriage. Akbar got worried.

 

Akbar had an intelligent Brahmin as the first minister and his name was Birbal. When Akbar expressed his concern about his daughter’s sexual fear, Birbal told him to leave it to him to sort it out.

 

Birbal also found through the spies the reason for her strange fear. Then he replaced all the cocks and hens in her vicinity with pigeons. Pigeons openly make love. She watched them making love, having little ones cared by both. Then she got rid of her fear and slowly expressed interest in getting married.

 

The author says that among the animals, goats have un natural sex with its own dear near ones and cocks and chameleons have uncontrolled sex.

 

My old articles on Nature as Teacher:

The Connection between William Wordsworth and Dattatreya

posted on 28 September 2011

13 Saints in Nature! posted 7th November 2013

 

–Subham–